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20h
answered A way to ensure that a system tray icon is removed… guaranteed
Apr
24
awarded  c++
Apr
23
revised how to handle arbitrary dimensional vector in c++?
forgot to link Adam answer.
Apr
23
revised how to handle arbitrary dimensional vector in c++?
New example code.
Apr
23
answered how to handle arbitrary dimensional vector in c++?
Apr
22
comment Usage of signed vs unsigned variables for flags in C++
@qub1n but answering your question, if you must stick with integers for flagging, use signed ones if (and only if) the negative values have some kind of meaning and if (and only if) you're working in only one platform to avoid the different negative number representations problems which could have different binary layout in different platforms.
Apr
22
comment Usage of signed vs unsigned variables for flags in C++
@qub1n My opinion is that you cannot make assumptions about the type of a flag unless you have total control over your source code (for example: if you're NOT developing a library to be used by other team) but if you make a choice you must stick wit it for consistency. Using integers for flagging (signed or unsigned) is error prone due to unexpected/uncontrolled type conversions and because an integer doesn't have flag semantics; if it was my choice I'll avoid integers (signed or unsigned) for this task and use an enum or a bitset or a vector<bool>.
Apr
22
comment Usage of signed vs unsigned variables for flags in C++
@FilipKowalski yes, I've seen negative values into enumerations, many times. enum e { UNKNOWN = -1, FOO = 0, BAR = 2, BAZ = 4 }; remember that the enums aren't used only for flagging. Anyway, if we want to ensure signess or unsigness for the enum underlying type we should be moving to C++ strong enums.
Apr
22
comment Usage of signed vs unsigned variables for flags in C++
It is known that the flags are always positive integers, this isn't true. The underlying type of an enumeration shall be an integer type large enough to fit all the values of the enum; this is usually an int. Also each enumerated type shall be compatible with char or a signed/unsigned integer type.
Apr
22
accepted Stopping long-sleep threads
Apr
21
revised Stopping long-sleep threads
added 30 characters in body
Apr
21
comment Stopping long-sleep threads
@AlexandreLavoie what a fail! Thanks, I'll correct it! :)
Apr
21
asked Stopping long-sleep threads
Apr
21
comment c++14 value initialization issue
@AndreKostur I meant that when standard says undefined behaviour the compilers should define something to place in this gap (even if they place nothing in there, but to put nothing is something deliberate after all), so is undefined from the standard point of view and sort of defined from the point of view of the compiler.
Apr
21
comment c++14 value initialization issue
@LightningRacisinObrit so the urban legend about the nasal demons is also a lie? :O Just joking, I completely agree there's a limit to the behaviour of undefined behaviour, at least it should be defined on the compiler side, isn't it?
Apr
20
awarded  Constituent
Apr
14
accepted Runtime sized arrays and pointer-decay
Apr
13
comment Runtime sized arrays and pointer-decay
@interjay I've tested with T* and it decayed, so if you make an answer of the comment (explaining why T* decays while T*& does not) I'll accept the answer.
Apr
13
comment Runtime sized arrays and pointer-decay
My bad! I really thoguth that runtime sized arrays were included in C++14 (that's why I added the C++14 tag). Anyway it doesn't change the question: why VLA doesn't decay to pointer in this example?
Apr
13
revised Runtime sized arrays and pointer-decay
typo