13,332 reputation
12160
bio website
location United Kingdom
age 30
visits member for 4 years, 4 months
seen 1 hour ago

Enthusiastic computer scientist and somewhat sporadic author of articles for ACCU journals.

Likes: games programming, challenges, learning new things, code craftsmanship, watching people achieving to the best of their ability, Git.

Dislikes: untidy code, weak architecture, bad software processes, indifference, technological fads.

Very quick bio: My D.Phil. was in medical image segmentation. I then worked in industry for a bit, doing credit risk management at SunGard and software analytics/logic programming at Semmle. I'm currently working on computer vision at the University of Oxford.


Sep
3
revised Why does the program writes output like this?
added 3 characters in body
Sep
3
comment Why does the program writes output like this?
@Slava: I was attempting to provide additional value by saying that had he insisted on that (he didn't, quite evidently), it would have been possible (had X been a polymorphic type) to achieve what he wanted simply by changing the body of f and leaving the arguments alone. Had X been a polymorphic type, that had the potential to be an interesting aside that the OP might have found useful. As it happens, I missed the fact that X wasn't a polymorphic type, so I've removed the comment.
Sep
3
comment Why does the program writes output like this?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Sep
3
comment Why does the program writes output like this?
@Slava: Yes, I did. That's why I said "if you were to insist on that". See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subjunctive_mood. It turns out I made a mistake in any case though, so I've removed it.
Sep
3
comment Why does the program writes output like this?
@T.C. Yes, fair point.
Sep
3
revised Why does the program writes output like this?
added 160 characters in body
Sep
3
comment Why does the program writes output like this?
@Slava: I've added a bit to answer it more explicitly.
Sep
3
revised Why does the program writes output like this?
added 160 characters in body
Sep
3
revised Why does the program writes output like this?
edited body
Sep
3
answered Why does the program writes output like this?
Aug
31
comment Grammar not recognizing || (OR) operator
@T.J.Crowder: I'm guessing "why doesn't it work and how do I fix it?" is the missing piece of the puzzle :)
Aug
19
comment Casting from an iterator to a defined type?
What about boost::optional<CFPoint>? Admittedly that involves introducing a dependency on Boost.
Aug
19
comment Casting from an iterator to a defined type?
Oops, sorry - you have a const_iterator, so &*it will have type const CFPoint* not CFPoint*. If you declare first and second with that type it should work hopefully.
Aug
19
comment Casting from an iterator to a defined type?
You can do &*it, which is of type CFPoint*. It's not casting it to CFPoint*, it's obtaining a CFPoint* that points to the element referred to by the iterator.
Aug
7
comment what kinds of geometry is suitable for rendering tree branches
Not sure unfortunately - I just did a quick Google to see what I could dig up for you.
Aug
7
comment what kinds of geometry is suitable for rendering tree branches
This looks potentially relevant: docs.speedtree.com/doku.php?id=branchintersections
Aug
7
reviewed Leave Open Javascript anchor href change and form post
Aug
7
reviewed Leave Open How to delete lines in a file in Python?
Aug
7
reviewed Leave Open Can GPU communicate with Southbridge independently?
Aug
7
reviewed Leave Open Interface Property Usage