12,264 reputation
11856
bio website
location United Kingdom
age 29
visits member for 3 years, 8 months
seen 7 hours ago

Enthusiastic computer scientist and somewhat sporadic author of articles for ACCU journals.

Likes: games programming, challenges, learning new things, code craftsmanship, watching people achieving to the best of their ability, Git.

Dislikes: untidy code, weak architecture, bad software processes, indifference, technological fads.

Very quick bio: My D.Phil. was in medical image segmentation. I then worked in industry for a bit, doing credit risk management at SunGard and software analytics/logic programming at Semmle. I'm currently working on object detection and tracking at the University of Oxford.


Dec
10
comment Stack memory allocation
@Zac: If you're showing him how to do something, you might as well show him the right way to do it up-front though. Not the way that will come back and bite him in the butt later. Nim's point is also a good one, since deleting a null pointer is a no-op.
Dec
10
comment Stack memory allocation
@Zac: "Bleurgh!" directed at the first example, for my part. Is it really such a great idea to inculcate newbies with the wonders of allocating memory and relying on the caller to release it again? :) To the OP -- read Effective C++, I seem to remember it having a good item on this particular point. Plus it's just a good book anyway.
Dec
10
comment is there anything in C++ to detect antivirus installed on windows 2003/2008 server operating systems
Trying to design a virus by any chance? :) The only two reasons I can think of to detect antivirus are (a) you're designing a virus and you want to disable/circumvent the antivirus, or (b) you're designing a security program to check whether someone's computer is adequately secured. Any other good reasons?
Dec
10
revised Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
added 197 characters in body
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
@Ben: Indeed, I phrased this wrong -- I meant to say that it's the C-style way of writing the C++ include, and it doesn't put things in namespace std.
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
The point being that stdio.h is both a C and C++ standard header. In C++, writing #include <stdio.h> includes the 'C-style' C++ header stdio.h. In other words, it's a C++ header, but stdio.h is the C-style way of writing the include.
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
@Ben: You're right -- it looks like #ifdef __cplusplus extern "C" { #endif etc.
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
Sure - that's the obvious implementation choice. I didn't downvote, just wanted to observe that "it's simply the name of the actual file on disk" isn't strictly accurate as far as the standard goes.
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
@Ben: They might not just include the C headers, but on popular compilers (I checked my cstdio header on MSVC before answering) they do nevertheless include them. Your point's an interesting one all the same though.
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
@Casebach: There are usually two separate files, cstdio and stdio.h, with cstdio including stdio.h in a way that puts all its symbols in namespace std. But the exact way in which it does it depends on the implementation.
Dec
10
comment Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
I don't want to downvote a competing answer, but this is actually inaccurate -- there's no guarantee that the files map or stdio.h exist on disk.
Dec
10
answered Why do some includes need the .h and others not?
Dec
10
comment Type error in a template function
Indeed, +1
Dec
9
comment Is there anything that can be done in C and not in C++ and the opposite way
@Noah: +1 :) In the sense that it's Turing-complete, however, there's nevertheless nothing you can compute in C that you can't compute in Brainfuck. That doesn't mean that I think all games, for example, should be written in Brainfuck.
Dec
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Dec
9
comment Is there anything that can be done in C and not in C++ and the opposite way
@Steve314: Certainly, I wouldn't argue otherwise.
Dec
9
answered Is there anything that can be done in C and not in C++ and the opposite way
Dec
9
comment How to run g++ from a terminal window on my Mac
For what it's worth, the Xcode uninstall is not 100% obvious, so you might want to see developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Xcode/Conceptual/… for details. Or just Google it.
Dec
9
answered How to run g++ from a terminal window on my Mac
Dec
9
answered Type error in a template function