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seen Aug 17 '12 at 17:27

Aug
10
accepted Perl: Class::Struct Without the Type Constraints
Aug
9
asked Perl: Class::Struct Without the Type Constraints
Aug
9
accepted Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
Aug
9
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
Sorry it took so long to upvote this; I haven't been on the web for a while :)
Aug
8
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
I've been looking at Ruby's library some more, and it seems that whilst Python's sequence manipulation functions are genralized to any iterable, Ruby has hard-coded quite a lot them to specific sequence types. That was actually really suprising...
Aug
8
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
Hmm... that zipping example returns an array, which means it couldn't have been lazily evaluated, right? That means the result would have been computed in its entiety regardless of whether I wanted to evaluate all the resulting elements or not. This is why I'm not a fan of arrays, but I wonder if there was a version of that zip method that returned a lazy enumerator rather than an eagerly-evaluated array? Thanks for the help so far.
Aug
8
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
But TBH I wouldn't want to use a full blown generator-equivilent for something as trivial as concatenating or zipping multiple ranges.
Aug
8
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
Thanks for the help. I was looking for operations like zipping and appending; can you do such things on ranges? If not, what is the Ruby equivilent for performing such operations on Range-like data?
Aug
8
asked Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
Jul
20
comment Perl: Are Special Variables Thread Safe?
@Eric: So treat shared data as if they were being sent through UNIX pipes :) Got it, thanks for the help.
Jul
19
comment Perl: Are Special Variables Thread Safe?
@Eric: So I should avoid performing operations that results in large data structures having to have each member having threads::shared :shared applied to them. OK, got it. So converting complex data to a simple scalar value will speed up general sharing between threads? Sort of makes sense.
Jul
19
comment Perl: Are Special Variables Thread Safe?
@salva: Yeah, by performance penalty I was referring to the creation of new threads with brand new copies of local data, which seems suspiciously familiar to forking new processes. When I'm talking about external resources, I suppose an example is in order. If, due to poor design, I had a package that used a hard-coded file to read/write persistent data, should I synchronize the access in order to make it thread safe even if I'm not going to be using it myself at the current moment in time from multiple threads? Is it just common courtesy to do so in modern Perl packages?
Jul
19
accepted Perl: Are Special Variables Thread Safe?
Jul
19
comment Perl: Are Special Variables Thread Safe?
Goody, goody. I've started toying around with the threads module after having a few long sessions with Java threads. This is bliss in comparison, but no doubt that thread-local variables have a performance penalty. Should I put locks around external resources in when writing modules to make them thread-safe even if I'm not intending to use it in a thread-safe manner myself?
Jul
19
asked Perl: Are Special Variables Thread Safe?
Jul
19
accepted Should Laziness be Documented in an API?
Jul
19
comment Should Laziness be Documented in an API?
What are you talking about? gets() is the quintessential example of a secure and validated library function, silly.
Jul
19
comment Should Laziness be Documented in an API?
No, just any API in general really. Sorry, perhaps this question is a tad vauge.
Jul
19
comment Should Laziness be Documented in an API?
"Warning: this module may crash because the coder was too lazy to validate input"
Jul
19
asked Should Laziness be Documented in an API?