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visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen Aug 17 '12 at 17:27

Jul
30
comment Telnet Clients and Their Treatment of EOL
Ahh... I suspected it was to do with two clients running in different configurations or modes. The behavior seemed too consistent to be a server-side read-amount fluke. Given that the Telnet client is merely a test bed, and the client will eventually use TCP directly, I'll only embed that mode byte sequence temporarily. Thanks for the RFC numbers, I'll look them up :)
Jul
30
comment Telnet Clients and Their Treatment of EOL
Do you think that the consistent behavior is because Linux's Telnet client automatically buffers lines before EOL, so the server receives it all in one go due to the client?
Jul
30
comment Telnet Clients and Their Treatment of EOL
Ah, I see. That confuses me though. So how does read know how many bytes to read before stopping when data becomes available?
Jul
30
comment Telnet Clients and Their Treatment of EOL
I meant 'messaging' as an abstract concept for my application, I know it's all stream and buffer based. I assumed read would block until it receives EOF, filling up the buffer until that point is met?
Jan
20
comment custom iterator performance
Ah, of course. Funny how the really obvious things I miss out =) I never really understood why Python and Ruby think exceptions should be used for things like that...
Jan
20
comment Why are Reference Counting GCs Stigmatised?
Can't remember. If it was making a precise technical point that would be a problem, but it's making a vague cultural point that I go on to elaborate, so it isn't particularly relevant IMO.
Jan
17
comment Real-Mode x86 ASM: How are the Basics Done?
I suppose if I'm writing just enough code to boot a custom protected mode OS, the BIOS API should suffice meaning I don't have to get my hands too dirty?
Jan
17
comment Real-Mode x86 ASM: How are the Basics Done?
Ah, so 0x3f2 is referring to the first floppy drive's digital output register, and writes 0 to it, which does 'motor enable 0', which I guess disables it. Got it. Where can I find such comprehensive information on /all/ the hardware I can control from the BIOS?
Dec
19
comment C++ Lambdas, Capturing, Smart Ptrs, and the Stack: Why Does this Work?
So the capturing and storing of the reference is handled as a special case rather than stored as a member in the std::function instance, say. Thanks.
Dec
19
comment C++ Lambdas, Capturing, Smart Ptrs, and the Stack: Why Does this Work?
So am I right in understanding that the std::function object itself stores the captures values throughout the duration of the instance? And that by storing this reference, the shared_ptr reference count never hits 0? Ah, I see. How elegant.
Dec
11
comment PHP 5.3: How on Earth is this Variable Undefined?
Just out of interest, is there any particular reason why PHP can't automatically capture the variable for me?
Dec
11
comment PHP 5.3: How on Earth is this Variable Undefined?
Thanks, that's what I was looking for. Explicit capturing... interesting. C++11 has this too, but at least it has the 'capture all' and 'capture all by reference' options. Does PHP have anything equivalent?
Aug
17
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
LOOP isn't a language-level construct, it's a macro with its own DSL, or at least it is in CL. Of course macros basically are language-level constructs, but I was talking about languages that prefer to wire features in as opposed to providing macros or blocks or whatever else. You could make a 'topics' system via a macro system, seeing as it's a full language compiler, but I was talking in the context of a language with hard-wired constructs like Perl.
Aug
15
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
Just to add, I think that for a language to take the area of topicalization seriously, it needs to wire it into the language's rules, not make it a corner case with a global variable and ad-hoc rules for certain built-ins and specific-subs with specific prototypes. It just isn't that seamless in Perl, despite how much it tried. The fact that you have to ever explicitly mention $_ shows it could have been done better. How about a topic system that uses dynamic scoping to introduce new topics and restore old ones, and that such a system would only allow inferring where the context is clear?
Aug
15
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
I'm writing a language just for practice, I'm not writing a new language for any serious reason or trying to replace anything. I'm writing it in Perl, so I know how Perl does it, in fact it was Perl that inspired the post. Yeah, I get how topicalizers work in Perl, but I don't think they work very well at all. The $_ variable is seriously inconsistent with regards to use with the built-ins, and it also requires explicitly prototyped subs in order to work properly via the _ prototype element. Not to mention it doesn't play nice with OOP, with indirect object access being crippled in Perl.
Aug
15
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
Well, I was thinking of storing a reference to the current topic in the execution state's object, and then getting the language parser to request it when it finds areas where it needs it to remove ambiguity. But I was wondering whether pasting the topic into the correct places in a precompilation stage would be better. Or whatever other techniques I don't know about.
Aug
15
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
Done. But don't you think implicit topics really boils down to readability in contexts in code? BTW, I just want know about parsing topics, not the whole thing per se. I'll get to work to changing it to a real question.
Aug
15
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
NullUserException: OK, will do. I suppose my completely-over-the-top deprecation isn't for everyone.
Aug
15
comment Could Implicit Topics be Implemented Cleanly in a Language?
I also asked how to go about implementing the parser for such a concept. So you're wrong. The PHP bit was a joke -- despite really liking perl, I joke about Perl's readability a lot too.
Aug
14
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
But string-based DSLs don't use the Java grammar, which is why they need to have their meaning extracted by a runtime parser. Having a language allow a DSL to appear anywhere in its text -- in Java's case embedded within strings -- is not the same thing as having a language parse a DSL as a first-class citizen along with the rest of the code. Example of a real DSL in Haskell: augustss.blogspot.com/2009/02/…. There's no way you can do something like that in Java using first-class syntax in the language.