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Aug
14
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
DSLs-in-strings use a runtime parser, thus it isn't Java's compile-time parser, thus it isn't Java. Any code that must go though parsing steps outside javacc's compile time isn't natively Java (although whether it's valid JVM bytecode is a whole different story). Javacc will stick to a well-defined grammar that you could probably find on Oracle's website somewhere. No doubt they'll have something like a BNF grammar for it.
Aug
14
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
That's my personal definition; I'm sure there are many Java coders out there who think that languages-in-strings or code generators are actually DSLs. They're just wrong :p
Aug
14
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
A DSL that's parsed directly via Javacc's parser at compile time. I.e., not parsed by a hand parser like many DSLs-in-strings, or by any parser-to-reflection libraries. Code generators don't count either. It has to be parsed by the language's own parser without any conversions beforehand.
Aug
13
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
I just checked the Xtext Wikipedia page, and saw this statement: "Unlike standard parser generators, Xtext not only generates a parser, [...]". That implies it has to parse it, which in turn implies it ain't Java. Writing a whole parser in Java just to interpret a DSL shows that Java sucks at DSL construction.
Aug
13
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
If a Java DSL has to be done via a preprocessor or XML then it is, by definition, not a Java DSL. But I get the general point of your post, but I'd just like to say that I wasn't starting a DSL-in-Lisp vs DSL-in-Java flamewar, just more on DSL viability itself, which your bullet points covered nicely.
Aug
13
comment Lazy Evaluation vs Macros
I don't really understand what that statement has got to do with that new question. I mean, if something needs a different syntax, people will turn to different languages or try to implement DSLs. And that's what I'm talking about in that question.
Aug
13
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
@duffymo: You link proves my point: you can't do DSLs in Java, so they've had to implement the DSL with the combination of syntax-in-strings and chained method calls, it seems. A lot more clumsy than stuff you get in Haskell or Lisp, and considerably more error prone.
Aug
13
comment Are Project-Specific DSLs a Liability?
@Affe: Very true, lol. But to be fair there's only so many DSLs that can penetrate into every programmer's must-learn list like regular expressions and SQL has.
Aug
13
comment Lazy Evaluation vs Macros
I saw a full '80s BASIC written in a Haskell DSL that had GOTO, IF, and everything. Macros could also do this, of course. But if Haskell's lazy evaluation can produce an entire programming language, I imagine it could do stuff like switch statements etc.
Aug
13
comment Lazy Evaluation vs Macros
I forked the question in that comment to a new question: stackoverflow.com/questions/7052963/…
Aug
13
comment Lazy Evaluation vs Macros
Isn't providing an effortless way to add new syntax to a language just asking for maintainability problems in large projects? I mean, DSLs are fine when when they're well defined and widespread like regular expressions and SQL. But I'm not so sure that user defined-languages popping up in every project is a particularly great idea. After all, we use languages because they're good at certain things -- Not so we can just implement other languages. I'm probably wrong though. Y'know, this might be an interesting debate for a separate question...
Aug
13
comment Lazy Evaluation vs Macros
Examples? OK, it's often the trivial examples stacked up that start causing problems. For example, if I set up a massive map/grep/sort pipeline in Perl 5, each stage has to evaluate the entire damn thing, write the whole thing into memory, and then feed it to the next stage. Rather than storing one computed element in memory at for each step, the whole thing needs storing. If you're retrieving something from, let's say, a file or an infinite sequence, it becomes tedious to do, often resorting to state, albeit encapsulated state.
Aug
10
comment Perl: Assign Coderef to Method without Symbol Table Hacks
@Eric: Thanks, that was just what I was looking for.
Aug
10
comment Perl: Assign Coderef to Method without Symbol Table Hacks
OK, after trying all of this approaches you suggested, I'm going to stick to the warnings-circumvention approach. Unfortunately, I'm disabling all warnings when I only want to disable the specific warning for defining unused symbols. The perldiag documentation is extremely dense; do you know what the specific warning type is for that particular violation? Thanks for the help so far.
Aug
10
comment Perl: Assign Coderef to Method without Symbol Table Hacks
Actually, for former approach works, but none of the OO-method calling syntactic magic works with it, so I'm now going to try your second suggestion :)
Aug
10
comment Perl: Assign Coderef to Method without Symbol Table Hacks
Hmm, the first approach could work quite nicely. Am I right in saying that the first approach would reevaluate the anonymous sub per constructor call? If so, I suppose I could store the default coderef in a state variable, and then assign it per call, which should theoretically only assign the actual reference, not reevaluate the whole anonymous sub every time.
Aug
10
comment Perl: Class::Struct Without the Type Constraints
I figured that by the time I hack the symbol table and use the unnecessary type constraints (even if they are only scalars that can refer to anything), I haven't gained much of a clarity increase over using Object::Accessor. Regarding the performance of hashref vs arrayref classes, I'm going to look into that :) Might even roll out a blessed array with Object::Accessor. If it isn't particularly harder.
Aug
10
comment Perl: Class::Struct Without the Type Constraints
Thanks for the advice. The Class::Struct documentation says it uses its own constructor, but I'd like to specify default values for arguments. My first idea was to hack the symbol table to move the Class::Struct-generated constructor to struct_new, and then redefine my own new sub that calls struct_new after resolving the default arguments. The other idea is to see what Class::Struct generates, and then explicitly write an overriding sub new that does what the old one did, but with added argument validation. But the former idea seems to break encapsulation a little less. Is there a better way?
Aug
9
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
Sorry it took so long to upvote this; I haven't been on the web for a while :)
Aug
8
comment Ruby: Manipulate Iterators?
I've been looking at Ruby's library some more, and it seems that whilst Python's sequence manipulation functions are genralized to any iterable, Ruby has hard-coded quite a lot them to specific sequence types. That was actually really suprising...