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bio website chrishowie.com
location United States
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Apr 10 at 17:37

I make stuff on the computer.


Apr
10
revised How to change proxy settings in Android (especially in Chrome)
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27
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21
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21
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20
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20
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14
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14
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Mar
14
comment How to connect to MySQL server on another host?
@Davo Of course you would also want to use a firewall to restrict access to the server. ;)
Mar
5
awarded  Good Answer
Mar
5
comment PHP: Converting dollars to cents
@Mala "a floating point is going to be used" If you are referring to IEEE floating-point (which is of limited precision), no, it does not have to be used. bcmul() and friends use (theoretically) infinite precision floating point. The fact that it's floating-point is not as important as the fact that it's imprecise.
Feb
28
awarded  html
Feb
27
revised I'd like someone to help me understand a few lines of code
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Feb
26
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22
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22
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Feb
21
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Feb
12
comment PHP: Converting dollars to cents
@EricPostpischil In other words, while your advice may be true in the large picture of "all financial software," in the context of "manipulation of balances," (and specifically this question) using imprecise floating-point numbers an extremely common mistake and causes all sorts of problems. If you would like me to amend my statement, I will restate as "floating-point numbers should not be used to calculate balances, credits, or debits, unless you have a very specific reason that this is appropriate in your case, and usually it won't be."
Feb
12
comment PHP: Converting dollars to cents
@EricPostpischil That is true, but limited-precision floating-point in particular is extremely difficult to reason about correctly even when it comes to basic arithmetic, especially in the context of financial applications -- specifically when computing amounts of money. Unlimited-precision floating point is much easier to reason about, as is limited-precision fixed point. It is extremely rare that I see someone use an imprecise floating point type correctly in financial applications.
Feb
12
answered How do I configure git so that some code only is checked out for people with read access?