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comment Instantiate polymorphic member variable to be of appropriate type
C++ doesn't have a reliable way to obtain the type of the "calling object" at runtime (unless by "calling object" you mean this -- which you can obtain limited information about through RTTI), and even then you would need some reflection capability to create a new object of that type. In short, there is no answer that satisfies your specific request, because it can't be done in C++. There may be alternatives if you are open to them.
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comment How to delete pointer which used in MPI program?
@user3629171 The bug is in code you haven't shown us.
2d
comment C++ Class Inheritance Design Choice
The answer depends on which entity conceptually owns the "calculation" to which you refer. In this case, the calculation appears arbitrary (squaring some value) so we don't have enough information to justify any answer: either approach could work with the level of detail you've provided. Indeed, the correct answer given a different set of details could be "neither, make the calculation a free function."
Apr
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awarded  Enlightened
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29
awarded  Nice Answer
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Apr
21
comment passing a pointer to a built-in type defined on the fly in c++
As a workaround, you could use templates to give yourself access to constant lvalues on-the-fly, like so: template <int i> struct const_int { static int const value = i; } and then your call becomes function(&const_int<1>::value, ...) (and similar for the char). This will only work if the function accepts a pointer-to-constant-int though (int const *). (You could make the value static member non-const but then you run the risk of it being modified, and it would be bad for const_int<1>::value to suddenly become 42.)
Apr
21
comment passing a pointer to a built-in type defined on the fly in c++
@user3528438 Still wouldn't work -- you can't point to a literal, that makes no conceptual sense. (More correctly, you can't take a pointer to an rvalue, only an lvalue.)
Apr
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answered Differentiate between property and method with same name
Apr
3
comment confused about operators c++
Interesting, what I should have said anyway is that you have to do (2) but may not have to do (1) (but you should anyway). (1) without (2) doesn't really solve the problem unless you add more overloads. So ignore me. :)
Apr
3
comment confused about operators c++
I'd clarify that you get by doing only one of these, not necessarily both (it's not clear from your answer that you don't have to do both). To explain for OP, (2) will work because a one-arg constructor (if it's not marked explicit) becomes a conversion operator from the argument type to the class type, so Time(int) will implicitly be used to convert int values to Time objects.
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revised confused about operators c++
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Mar
15
answered C++ temporary class instantiation ambiguously
Mar
15
answered How to fix this C3848 error on vs2013?
Mar
15
reviewed Approve Why are my while parameters not being acknowledged
Mar
15
revised Why are my while parameters not being acknowledged
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Mar
15
answered Why are my while parameters not being acknowledged