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Feb
26
comment Compiler optimizations: Where/how can I get a feel for what the payoff is for different optimizations?
"Everything is a tradeoff" - we certainly don't see that statement enough on stackoverflow. +1
Feb
26
comment Remove characters from a string in C
Actually I prefer "if(amp && !strncmp(amp+1, "amp;") { /* we found it! */ }" and memcpy could be better to use for the actual compacting rather than an indexed iteration.
Feb
26
comment Remove characters from a string in C
Don't forget to use the mem* functions!
Feb
25
answered Multi-Threading on multi core architecture
Feb
25
revised Size of microprocessor
corr
Feb
24
answered union consisting of float : completely insane output
Feb
24
comment Why do programming languages round down until .6?
@orokusaki: the consistency of floating point numbers is absolute within their context which is base 2 arithmetic. Base 10 aritmetic maps one-to-one to base 2 in the context of integers but very seldom when it comes to fractions. For example 0.125, 0.25, 0.375, 0.5, 0.625, 0.75 and 0.875 are exactly representable in base 2 because they are sums of combinations of 2^-1, 2^-2 and/or 2^-3. Inconsistent ... not really.
Feb
24
answered Why do programming languages round down until .6?
Feb
23
comment Can compiler optimization introduce bugs?
@phkahler: It's like you say, you have to trust your tools or find others to replace them. I happen to know that compilers and optimkizers are written by some very smart people (not me though :()and with front-, middle- and back-ends maintained by separate teams code and optimizer quality should increase. As to the question of optimizer rules: it's easier to write optimizers according to generalized rules and produce what some might call bugs (volatile example) than trying to specify every single exception to the rules and risk bloated code that is difficult to maintain. +1
Feb
22
comment Assembly code vs Machine code vs Object code?
@Breton: it is certainly possible to write a program binary using a hex editor. Of course, the hex digits entered will correspond to the intended instructions and data. Messy but doable. I've used it for patching binary (firmware) images with bug fixes. I prefer to have a bit more than just the hex editor though :-)
Feb
22
comment Assembly code vs Machine code vs Object code?
@Christoph: you say "not all assembly instructions are translated 1:1 to machine instructions" please give an example.
Feb
22
comment Java vs. C# machine code the doing same thing
@Jon Skeet: I assume you're not including the JIT translate-to-native-code execution time in the total execution time? Aggressive levels of optimization, for example, take longer on C or c++ compilers than the more basic ones.
Feb
22
comment Java vs. C# machine code the doing same thing
@Riduidel: Is it as you say (i e an absolute truth) or are you just voicing your opinion (i e that YOU think it is like this or that it is your experience that it is like this)? Do you know for a fact that valve surfaces can have no significant impact on car performance? Are you talking of the surface in the valve guide, the one exposed to the combustion or the one fitting against the seating?
Feb
22
comment Java vs. C# machine code the doing same thing
I see replies getting -1 anonymously even thought they apparently are both competent and thought-through. What's the matter with people here, won't they stand for their downgrades?
Feb
22
comment Java vs. C# machine code the doing same thing
Is it the compilation step that produces native code or the fact that you start the program (without or without a debugger)?
Feb
22
comment Java vs. C# machine code the doing same thing
@StefanE: the execution environments for Java and C# should have similar performance. Of course where one is faster the other might be slower and vice versa. They will be (at least) an order of magnitude slower than compiled languages such as C and C++. An exception will be when they access functionality which has been written in a compiled language (as opposed to functionality written in Java/C#) where there will be only small differences. The interpreted part will still be slower but the compiled part will be as fast as if it were accessed from a compiled language.
Feb
22
revised What does “multicore” assembly language look like?
Additions
Feb
22
revised What does “multicore” assembly language look like?
clarifications
Feb
22
comment What does “multicore” assembly language look like?
They synchronize (rather than communicate) in one basic way and that is through the LOCK prefix (the instruction "xchg mem,reg" contains an implicit lock request) which runs to the lock pin which runs to all buses effectively telling them that the CPU (actually any bus-mastering device) wants exclusive access to the bus. Eventually a signal will return to the LOCKA (acknowledge) pin telling the CPU that it now has exclusive access to the bus. Since external devices are much slower than the internal workings of the CPU a LOCK/LOCKA sequence may require many hundreds of CPU cycles to complete.
Feb
22
comment What does “multicore” assembly language look like?
The BIOS will usually identify how many cores are available and will pass this information to the OS when asked. There are standards which the BIOS (and hardware) must conform to such that access to hardware specifics (processors, cores, PCI bus, PCI cards, mouse, keyboard, graphics, ISA, PCI-E/X, memory etc) for different PCs looks the same from the OS's point of view. If the BIOS doesn't report that there are four cores the OS will usually assume that there is only one. There might even be a BIOS setting to experiment with.