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location Stockholm, Sweden
age 56
visits member for 4 years, 1 month
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Consultant/Senior programmer on high performance and embedded systems. No OO, not my thing.


Jan
14
comment Why is x86 ugly? aka Why is x86 considered inferior when compared to others?
@Turing Complete: segment:offset was NOT primarily an attempt to stay compatible with the CP/M world. What it was was a very successful attempt to allow a 16 bit processor to address more than 64 KBytes by placing code, data, stack and other memory areas in different segments.
Dec
21
comment Encapsulation v Performance
An anonymous -1! Someone who won't stand for their downgrade, silly.
Dec
20
comment Why is x86 ugly? aka Why is x86 considered inferior when compared to others?
... "dword ptr" is used to specifiy the size of a variable whose size is not known if, for instance, it is simply declared as external or if you've been lazy.
Dec
20
awarded  Commentator
Dec
20
comment Why is x86 ugly? aka Why is x86 considered inferior when compared to others?
a, b and c in my examples should be viewed as memory-based variables and not to immediate values.
Dec
16
awarded  Promoter
Dec
14
comment How to pass user-defined data to a worker thread using IOCP?
"You can send special-purpose data of your own to the completion port via PortQueuedCompletionStatus." This is a confusing description. It should read "you can send a non-event originated IOC to the IOCP via PostQueuedCompletionStatus". In effect you can send dummy IOCs to give your service routine the impression that an IOC has occurred. What you want the IOC to do is up to you and your context.
Dec
14
answered How to pass user-defined data to a worker thread using IOCP?
Dec
10
revised Converting from unsigned long long to float with round to nearest even
corrections
Dec
10
revised Converting from unsigned long long to float with round to nearest even
corrections
Dec
10
answered Converting from unsigned long long to float with round to nearest even
Dec
10
awarded  Editor
Dec
8
comment What socket-based model should I use for many simultaneous connections?
(cont) If you are a server the first event means that you can issue a ReadFile to handle the next client request, the second that there is a client request which needs to be serviced, followed by a response issued to the port with WriteFile. Nothing wasted at all.
Dec
8
comment What socket-based model should I use for many simultaneous connections?
When you use selects you are in fact polling the socket. It doesn't matter if one thread can do select on 16 (or whatever) sockets simultaneously, it is still polling (albeit somewhat more efficient). One or more (or all) of the sockets included in the select will not be ready to be serviced and for every one of those you will have wasted (precious) CPU time. IOCPs signal events such as "WriteFile has completed writing" or "ReadFile has completed reading data". cont
Dec
8
comment What socket-based model should I use for many simultaneous connections?
There is a timeout parameter when waiting for I/O completions. When you timeout (i e there's no completion to service) you can run through your active sessions/connections and do housekeeping for example close sessions that haven't responded within a certain amount of time. If you foresee that the timeout won't happen because there will never be any free time you can make a very small thread that wakes up maybe once a second and sends a dummy I/O completion signaling time to do housekeeping. A thread that does so little will have no impact on performance as a whole.
Dec
7
comment Why is x86 ugly? aka Why is x86 considered inferior when compared to others?
The early eighties was an era when minicomputers were 16 bit PDPs from DEC. The VAX was just being introduced and with it the age of Super-minis: suddenly minicomputer processors were 32 bits, the same size as IBMs mainframes. So I'll venture to say that 1 MB of memory was HUGE back then. The fact that it could be done for a 16-bit processor was neat. "Clunky" is for 20-20 vision hindsighters. The 8086's memory wasn't filled immediately either. I think it worked quite (or why not very) well in its historical context.
Dec
7
comment Why is x86 ugly? aka Why is x86 considered inferior when compared to others?
Look around and you'll see CISCs dominating despite their supposedly "inferior" instruction set and architecture. RISC has managed to corner a piece of the market or created a new one. To describe this piece I will say that it is significant but not very significant. The CISCs are competent technology products whether you love them, hate them or whatever. So are RISCs. It probably won't be that much different in five years. Maybe in ten. Who knows?
Dec
7
comment Why is x86 ugly? aka Why is x86 considered inferior when compared to others?
Memory has always been slow. It is possibly (relatively speaking) slower today than it was when I began with Z80s and CP/M in 1982. Extinction is not the only path of evolution because with extinction that particular evolutionary direction stops. I would say the x86 has adapted well in its 28 year (so far existence).
Dec
7
answered What socket-based model should I use for many simultaneous connections?
Dec
7
answered CPU Cycle count based profiling in C/C++ Linux x86_64