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Apr
23
comment Python: find a list within members of another list(in order)
There is a small bug: the index returned (when substring is actually found) is one after the index of the first character. I think you should return pos-1 to correct for that. But nice answer, I noticed only because I'm using it :)
Mar
20
comment What is the difference between old style and new style classes in Python?
Interesting that you noticed in practice, I just read that this is because new-style classes, once they have found the attribute in the instance dict, have to do an additional lookup to work out whether it is a description, ie, it has a get method that needs to be invoked to get the value to be returned. Old style classes simple return the found object with no addition computations (but then do not support descriptors). You can read more in this excellent post by Guido python-history.blogspot.co.uk/2010/06/…, specifically the section on slots
Mar
13
revised Threading in Python
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Mar
13
answered Threading in Python
Jan
19
awarded  Commentator
Jan
19
comment Confusion about Python variable scope
I just realised that the commented out line # some_var[5] = 6 doesn't work because the local variable created just below shadows the global one from the beginning of the function scope, and not because its bad syntax in itself: you can access the global name, and if points to a mutable object you can change it, you just can't rebind the var name at global scope. So if you comment that line out instead, the commented out one would work. I know, that's what the answer says, but I misunderstood it on first reading, just a friendly warning to others :)
Jan
16
revised python packages: how to depend on the latest version of a separate package
added 593 characters in body
Jan
16
asked python packages: how to depend on the latest version of a separate package
Dec
8
comment django: modifying/extending 3rd party apps
however, how do you indicate in the repository for your main project that it requires a particular fork of an app? (I guess I could also ask in general how do you indicate that it requires a particular app). I guess for this you'd be better off copying the app in your project, but I guess then you lose the connection with the original 3rd party repository
Dec
8
accepted django: modifying/extending 3rd party apps
Dec
8
comment django: modifying/extending 3rd party apps
I just tried it and it's indeed a couple of clicks: go to the original repository, click on fork, add your description, and you have you 'copy' of the repository for the fork under your account, where you can make and commit your changes I guess also easily merge any changes from the main trunk. Yep definitely it's a neater solution, thanks!
Dec
8
comment django: modifying/extending 3rd party apps
right, the changes I made are exactly those in the solution by Lionel to the question you link to. By forking do you mean (somehow) creating my own branch of django-registration and make my changes there? I'm new with mercurial too, not sure I can make my own branch on a 3rd party repository, and sounds a bit overkill. I guess having a local app in my project with those changes would achieve the same in a more simple way, although probable less explicit
Dec
8
asked django: modifying/extending 3rd party apps
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6
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