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Apr
3
comment 'import module' or 'from module import'
In the last case, you can always use: import pkgN.sub.module as modN giving you distinct names for each module. You can also use the 'import modulename as mod1' pattern to shorten a long name, or to switch between implementations of the same API (e.g. DB API modules) with a single name change.
Apr
3
answered Backslashes being added into my cookie in Python
Apr
2
comment questions re: current state of GUI programming with Python
This may not be relevant, but wxPython has grown some more-fully-featured controls in recent years; some of those ListCtrl problems might (or might not) have been solvable by replacing with a newer/better control. But docs tend to be lacking... I agree that it should be easier than it is.
Apr
2
comment questions re: current state of GUI programming with Python
... it becomes more problematic by comparison with other GUI kits. I approve of Robin keeping wxPython as a thin wrapper over wxWidgets, but it is more like writing a GUI in C++ instead of Python... A drag-n-drop builder would be a great help - I wonder what happened to Boa Constructor?
Apr
2
comment questions re: current state of GUI programming with Python
It's been years since I've used wxPython, but Robin Dunn is awesome - spends huge amounts of time supporting wx as well as developing it, is very friendly & helpful, and has drastically reduced the impedance mismatch beween wxWidgets & Python. Sadly, even as the mismatch shrinks, ... (cont.)
Apr
2
comment questions re: current state of GUI programming with Python
I don't have extensive experience with Tkinter, but what I have done (along with a few forays into Perl-Tk) strongly supports the idea that Tk (in whatever form) is dandy for doing a slap-dash simple UI quickly, but that trying to do anything at all complex quickly becomes a struggle.
Apr
2
comment Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
Good point about multiple 'com' packages in different path-directories -- I'd only been considering the problems with sharing a single parent package, but separate packages of the same name is even worse.
Apr
2
comment Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
"Personally, I despise projects that can be undermined by success." I mostly agree (though 'despise' is rather strong), but at the same time, companies/projects that promise salvation and the One True Way give me hives...
Apr
2
comment Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
I'll do my part to support that +10 :)
Apr
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
2
comment Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
@jholloway7: See my edited answer about com/__init__.py for why import aliases don't actually help here.
Apr
2
revised Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
Added detailed clarification in response to comment; some spelling corrections.
Apr
2
comment Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
Given Python's filesystem-to-package mapping, using top-level packages like "com" and "org" would in fact create namespace collisions.
Apr
2
answered Why do languages like Java use hierarchical package names, while Python does not?
Apr
2
awarded  Commentator
Apr
2
comment How to compare type of an object in Python?
I'd say you (the OP) should definitely read the referenced link, which gives plenty of details of why checking the type of an object is usually a bad idea, and what you probably should be doing instead.
Apr
2
comment In Python how can I access “static” class variables within class methods
Also, I'd be careful saying 'main module', as it is the function's containing module that's searched, not the main module... And looking up the attribute from an instance ref is a different thing, but this answer does explain why you need the instance/class ref.
Apr
2
comment In Python how can I access “static” class variables within class methods
IIRC, there's technically 3(+) namespaces searched -- function-local, module/global, and builtins. Nested scopes means that multiple local scopes may be searched, but that's one of the exceptional cases. (...)
Jan
16
answered How do I determine the size of an object in Python?
Jan
15
answered Multithreaded Resource Access - Where Do I Put My Locks?