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Feb
13
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
22
awarded  Yearling
Oct
31
awarded  Popular Question
Aug
20
comment Why are particular C data types declared in more than one standard header file?
In C11 Chapter 7.19, it was said that size_t should be declared in <stddef.h>. Chapter 7.21.1 also says the same thing but for <stdio.h>. Chapter 7.22 also says the same thing but for <stdlib.h>. Chapter 7.27.1 says the same thing but for <time.h>. Chapter 7.28 says the same thing but for <uchar.h>. And so on.
Aug
19
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
@Cubbi, it turns out you had already include the AIX wctrans_t definition. Sorry for inconvenience. Could somebody here with higher authotiry delete my comments because it need not to be exist.
Aug
19
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
I'm so sorry. I means @Cubbi.
Aug
19
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
If you don't mind, would you update your answer to include the AIX wctrans_t definition?
Aug
19
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
@Cristophe, What? :-( BTW, +1, thanks for the surprised fact. :-)
Aug
18
revised Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
added 4 characters in body
Aug
18
accepted Why are particular C data types declared in more than one standard header file?
Aug
18
revised Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
added 16 characters in body
Aug
18
accepted Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
Aug
18
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
Apart from your comment, I think the C11 statement that says both wctrans_t and wctype_t are scalar types has a too broad meaning because scalar types can also be float, boolean, string, etc. It is better to say they both are integer types.
Aug
18
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
+1 for very useful explanation and information. Thank you.
Aug
18
revised Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
added 9 characters in body
Aug
18
comment Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
+1, thanks for a proof, and possibly an acceptance later. :)
Aug
18
revised Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
edited title
Aug
18
asked Is there a reason for any C or C++ compiler to not define wctrans_t and wctype_t as the type wchar_t?
Aug
18
comment Why are particular C data types declared in more than one standard header file?
The things that I can't think of is why C standard authors thought such a duplicate definitions in multiple headers should be dictated in the standard. What are the advantages of saying it in the standard? It is easy for C compiler developers to just include the headers that contain the required type definitions, and this will not break the compatibility with older C codes that assumed the particular types (e.g. size_t) were surely defined in some headers (e.g. stdio.h).
Aug
17
comment Why are particular C data types declared in more than one standard header file?
@trentcl, +1 for your statement "it breaks (practically all) pre-C99 C", but for the rendundancy, stdio.h could include stddef.h, couldn't it? BTW, I've been using GCC 4.8 of MinGW with Code::Block as its IDE. I've tried to use snprintf() in a simple code with only stdio.h is included, and GCC compiles it finely. In stdio.h of my GCC, there is #include <stddef.h> under #ifndef RC_INVOKED