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Mar
25
revised Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
Update to consider the possibility of the VM trapping RDTSC
Mar
25
comment Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
I'm wondering now if in fact the virtual machine is trapping the RDTSC... 50 billion cycles is a long time, at 3 GHz that's over 16 seconds. That would explain why you had so much time missing... 11 billion cycles... (44 - 33). How many times do you iterate - in other words, what's the value of the updates counter? See stackoverflow.com/questions/22579864/…
Mar
25
comment Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
The previous problem is that there were cycles that weren't being accumulated anywhere, because it seemed unnecessary to time branching back to the top of the loop... from the time of "iterateTime += rdtsc()-beginTime;" to the top of the inner loop "beginTime = rdtsc();" are cycles that aren't accumulated anywhere... if RDTSC were serializing then those cycles would be negligible, just the time to do an unconditional branch (never miss-predicted)... but because of potentially lingering cache misses eventually the CPU stalls... and you never counted that stall time.
Mar
25
revised Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
fixed typo
Mar
25
comment Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
I've added a suggestion on how to accumulate time without missing cycles... I haven't actually compiled it, so I may have missed something in the syntax... let me know if you try it out.
Mar
25
revised Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
Added suggested fix
Mar
25
revised Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
fixed typo
Mar
25
revised Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
Added explanation
Mar
25
answered Why is the execution time of a while-loop appears so weird?
Mar
25
revised calling memset from x86_64 assembly
Fixed error describing the saving of the caller's base pointer
Mar
25
comment calling memset from x86_64 assembly
See Chapter 5 Stack Alignment in same document, it says "The 64 bit systems keep the stack aligned by 16. The stack word size is 8 bytes, but the stack must be aligned by 16 before any call instruction. ... A procedure can rely on these rules when storing XMM data that require 16-byte alignment. This applies to all 64 bit systems (Windows, Linux, BSD).
Mar
25
answered calling memset from x86_64 assembly
Mar
25
answered How does the gcc “parallelize” code?
Mar
25
comment How does the gcc “parallelize” code?
The compiler doesn't parallelize your code in the sense of multi-threading, it does "vectorize" your code if it can pack multiple operands into a vector register, but that isn't what is going on here.
Mar
24
comment Proper way to subtract two 64 bit numbers in x86 assembly
I think I found the reference, what it says is that sbbq (q=quadword, or 64-bits) is only available in 64-bit mode. You should use sbbl, here's that link docs.oracle.com/cd/E19253-01/817-5477/eoizh/index.html
Mar
24
comment Proper way to subtract two 64 bit numbers in x86 assembly
en.m.wikibooks.org/wiki/X86_Assembly/Arithmetic
Mar
24
comment Proper way to subtract two 64 bit numbers in x86 assembly
Is that documentation online? Can you point me to it?
Mar
24
comment difference between return 1, return 0 and return -1 and exit?
exit is a standard library function, so if you use it you need to #include <stdlib.h>, which isn't necessary if you use return
Mar
24
answered Proper way to subtract two 64 bit numbers in x86 assembly
Mar
24
answered Register being overwritten in x86 Assembly