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Mar
21
comment Boost.Log linking error on OS X El Capitan v10.11.3 and Xcode 7.2 Beta (LLVM 7.0.2, clang -700.1.81)
I finally solved a similar problem (El Capitan, vanilla Homebrew install, Boost::Log, trivial log example). I don't use the Xcode IDE, but I was having trouble with linker errors on the command line until I used this: c++ -DBOOST_LOG_DYN_LINK -lboost_log-mt -o main main.cpp. (No space between '-' and 'D') Might be worth trying...
Mar
20
comment Link errors using Homebrew's Boost::Log in OSX El Capitan
@MarshallClow my forgetfulness - I have corrected my statement. I meant bootstrap.sh script. Neither that nor b2 is in the Homebrew installation.
Mar
16
comment Implementing logging using globals and functors
So as I thought, it's not relevant to my problem - one way or another, we've got this nicely formatted string, but nowhere is it actually outputted or sent to the "LogSink". I guess the referenced answer didn't attempt to describe that.
Mar
16
comment Implementing logging using globals and functors
My apologies, I was referring to the code in the SO article I referenced, which I thought was irrelevant in my case. I have edited my OP so that #define LOG is exactly like the referenced answer.
Mar
16
comment Implementing logging using globals and functors
Yes, but I don't see where it's actually being outputted. Is that being done by the part that begins "static cast<...>"?
Mar
16
comment Implementing logging using globals and functors
Where, in all of this, is my_message written anywhere?
Mar
14
comment copy files while preserving directory structure in mac
I had to use rsync -Rr: -R for relative path names, and -r for recursive descent into subdirectories. (Which, of course, only matters if you want directories rather than specifically-selected files.)
Feb
26
comment On-demand algorithm to return successive combinations of k elements from n
@rici: Nice visual - that helps to clarify the indexing arithmetic. And you're quite correct - there's no limitation to using a sequence of integers, since they could then be used to index into any vector of n symbols.
Feb
26
comment On-demand algorithm to return successive combinations of k elements from n
Ah! I get it. The first two bullets are, in effect, looking for a potential "carry" and locating the leftmost element that would be affected by the right-to-left "ripple" of carries that would occur if i_k were incremented. Having located that element, it can increment the element to the immediate left, and then set the elements to the right to the progressively higher values demanded by point #2 ("Represent every k-combination in increasing order..."). So I do think @rici's simplification makes sense.
Feb
26
comment On-demand algorithm to return successive combinations of k elements from n
@rici: I'm still trying to get my head around Leandro's solution, but I think it could work for any set of characters that have an ordering, despite his stated assumption that the n elements are integers. Your suggested simplification, I think, requires them to be the integers 1..n, since you perform arithmetic on the actual values (i_r - r). Am I correct about this? (EDIT: oops, never mind, I see that the solution does rely at least on the ability to increment an element)
Dec
23
comment How to implement a writer-preferring read/write lock for *nix processes
I do need for the lock to be released if the process crashes. I've amended my original question to state this explicitly. Still learning about boost named synchronization primitives...
Dec
23
comment How to implement a writer-preferring read/write lock for *nix processes
I think - and please correct me if I'm wrong - that the OS must somehow be involved in the lock management for coordinated processes; otherwise, if one crashes holding a lock, the lock might never be cleaned up. (I was unsure whether interthread locking would care about this.) Boost is indeed an option. Having looked at the link you provided, the most likely candidate appears to be the Named Utilities.
Aug
4
comment Remote access to DOS command line from Unix
@merlin2011 Can one telnet to Windows, and reach a DOS command line? (I've only seen telnet et al. used to connect from Windows to a Unix-like box.)
May
1
comment Changing Linux 'ps' output by changing argv[0]
That appears to be correct. And I've verified that argv[1..n] point to those null-terminated arguments, which means that I'll end up clobbering argv[1..n]. Something to be aware of.
May
1
comment Changing Linux 'ps' output by changing argv[0]
@osgx: Well, I can't seem to format it properly, but it corresponds to tetromino's description below.
May
1
comment Changing Linux 'ps' output by changing argv[0]
00000000 66 6f 6f 00 5f 74 65 73 74 00 66 6f 6f 00 62 61 |foo._test.foo.ba| 00000010 72 00 |r.|
Apr
30
comment change process name without change argv[0] in Linux
I think that the \0 is unnecessary - isn't it already silently appended to a literal string of characters?
Mar
10
comment Can't catch an exception
Not this Chap, surely...
Feb
26
comment Can't catch an exception
Mercy! I plumb forgot. Thank 'ee!
Feb
26
comment Catching a Boost exception and extracting its message
However, if -- instead of throw wd_sprintf_exception(what); -- I simply write throw;, my uncaught exception message says terminating with uncaught exception of type boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<boost::exception_detail::error_info_injector‌​<boost::io::bad_format_string> >: boost::bad_format_string: format-string is ill-formed, which at least is the text I'm after!