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visits member for 3 years, 7 months
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  • Assembler programmer since dawn of time.
  • Perl enthusiast
  • Unix enthusiast
  • C/C++
  • MySQL

Working as Systems Analyst for direct marketing cooperative database.


Jul
8
comment Creating a USB-flash boot drive for booting Linux on Mac hardware
In fact, I'm using rEFInd (rEFIt is no longer being maintained). But that is a side issue to the one I'm posting about: namely, how to create a mountable, bootable disk so that rEFInd can see it and let me select it.
May
1
comment Changing Linux 'ps' output by changing argv[0]
That appears to be correct. And I've verified that argv[1..n] point to those null-terminated arguments, which means that I'll end up clobbering argv[1..n]. Something to be aware of.
May
1
comment Changing Linux 'ps' output by changing argv[0]
@osgx: Well, I can't seem to format it properly, but it corresponds to tetromino's description below.
May
1
comment Changing Linux 'ps' output by changing argv[0]
00000000 66 6f 6f 00 5f 74 65 73 74 00 66 6f 6f 00 62 61 |foo._test.foo.ba| 00000010 72 00 |r.|
Apr
30
comment change process name without change argv[0] in Linux
I think that the \0 is unnecessary - isn't it already silently appended to a literal string of characters?
Mar
10
comment Can't catch an exception
Not this Chap, surely...
Feb
26
comment Can't catch an exception
Mercy! I plumb forgot. Thank 'ee!
Feb
26
comment Catching a Boost exception and extracting its message
However, if -- instead of throw wd_sprintf_exception(what); -- I simply write throw;, my uncaught exception message says terminating with uncaught exception of type boost::exception_detail::clone_impl<boost::exception_detail::error_info_injector‌​<boost::io::bad_format_string> >: boost::bad_format_string: format-string is ill-formed, which at least is the text I'm after!
Feb
26
comment Catching a Boost exception and extracting its message
Still isn't working quite right. I've now changed it to catch (boost::io::format_error& e) { and everything else is the same, including throw wd_sprintf_exception(what); (wd_sprintf_exception is derived from std::runtime_error.) The client wraps his call to wd_sprintf with try { ... } catch (std::runtime_error& e) { cout << e.what() << endl;}. The exception isn't caught; instead I abort with uncaught exception of type wd_sprintf_exception.
Feb
26
comment Catching a Boost exception and extracting its message
That is helpful, and catching by reference did away with the compiler error. But I still don't know how to extract a message out of e. (e.what() doesn't work because boost::exception doesn't have what() )
Feb
17
comment Using a shared_ptr<string> into an unordered_set<string>
An object called a "Block" has an input buffer into which is read tab-separated character strings. Block's buffer parser creates a vector of std::strings. The user calls Block accessor methods to obtain these strings. Once they are in the user's hands, their lifetime is unpredictable, and they can certainly outlive the input buffer and the vector of strings. Would you agree that there is no "natural owner" of such a string?
Feb
17
comment Using a shared_ptr<string> into an unordered_set<string>
Thanks for clarifying how to use shared_ptr. It sounds like my biggest flaw was in thinking that the removal of the final reference to a string could somehow cause the string to be erased from the unordered_set.
Feb
17
comment Using a shared_ptr<string> into an unordered_set<string>
(See UPDATE 1 of original question for a fuller explanation)
Feb
17
comment Using a shared_ptr<string> into an unordered_set<string>
As a matter of fact, this was a "memref" that pointed into an input buffer. Then I discovered circumstances when the buffer needed to be used a second time while memrefs into the first buffer still needed to be valid, so I "interned" every substring as a separate string in an unordered_set<string> first, and then pointed the memref there. I assumed that there would always be a point at which the user could call a function to clear the interned set, but this wasn't always easy. So I decided to try strings that would go away when no longer referenced.
Feb
17
comment Using a shared_ptr<string> into an unordered_set<string>
The unordered_set will never go out of scope. I guess its main contribution is to keep only a single instance of each string value. However, more to the point, when I originally wrote the code I've been trying to optimize, I understood a lot less about move semantics and references than I do now, and I suspect I wrote it inefficiently. I will append to the OQ a better explanation of what I'm trying to do.
Feb
12
comment File::Slurp into a multi-GB scalar - how to split efficiently?
@ThisSuitIsBlackNot - I tried that; takes a long time.
Jan
21
comment Deferring evaluation of function-call arguments
I didn't know that macros could use variadic arguments... this will work. I'll leave the question open a little longer to see if there are any non-preprocessor solutions.
Jan
9
comment Implementing a “string pool” that is guaranteed not to move
Great stuff. I've no idea what the enable_if is about, but I'll work with it.
Jan
7
comment Implementing a “string pool” that is guaranteed not to move
This may be the simplest way to go: as I read The C++ Standard Library by Josuttis, insert (or emplace) won't invalidate pointers. I think I could also use unordered_set -- although since the only lookups are done once, at insertion time, I don't imagine the difference between O(1) and O(log(n)) would matter much. And, not that it matters much either, I like that a set consolidates equal values. Could you confirm that unordered_set would also work here?
Jan
7
comment Implementing a “string pool” that is guaranteed not to move
You say "when the vector is resized, the strings are moved efficiently." What happens to the char*'s into those strings, that are required to remain valid?