88,056 reputation
651132
bio website datenwolf.net
location Munich, Germany
age 31
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 11 mins ago
  • Physicist (German "Diplom" graduation)
  • Computer Science interests:
    • 3D graphics (Online and Offline)
    • signal processing
    • CPU architectures
    • compiler design and implementation
    • networks
    • embedded and realtime systems

Currently working on PhD researching the fundamental physics of FDML lasers.

Co-Founder and R&D at Optores


4h
comment Android - How to know maximal size/dimensions of the image that the device can load
@Narek: This is very similar (but not identical) to how there's a certain limit on the size of a processor's registers (8 bit, 16 bit, 32 bit, 64 bits) and anything larger than what fits into the register can not be directly processed. Similar for GPUs. The TFIU has a certain size limit on what it can deal with.
4h
comment Android - How to know maximal size/dimensions of the image that the device can load
@Narek: No. VRAM is basically a cache for the GPU. But applying a texture involves a special kind of data processing, which is implemented by special hardware (texture fetch and interpolation unit TFIU) which (even on programmable GPUs) is a hardwired piece of silicon in current GPU designs. The design and implementation of this special piece of the GPU inherently limits the amount of pixels in a texture that the texturing unit can handle. If the TFIU has been designed with a limit of 2048 pixels in one dimension, then that's that. No way around it.
7h
comment Can i use a variable to declare the size of an array? C
Important caveat: VLAs live on automatic storage (usually implemented as stack) and hence all limitations of that apply. I.e. only suitable for small-ish size and pointers to it can not be returned.
9h
comment Android - How to know maximal size/dimensions of the image that the device can load
@Narek: Because the GPU simply cannot handle more. This is an implementation limit (other implementations may have completely different limits) and in most cases the limit is imposed by the capabilities of the hardware. The GPU in your device simply cannot deal with more.
1d
comment why is my c program not executing..windows shows with a dialogue saying that check online solution for this
Why has this question been closed? It's absolutely not unclear what's going on. I was about to submit my answer when the close hammer fell. Posted the answer as comment. Sometimes (often actually) you have to deal with newbies and those don't yet know what is going on and what to look for. Don't fall the close hammer on newbs.
1d
comment why is my c program not executing..windows shows with a dialogue saying that check online solution for this
Windows does show this "searching for a solution" message, when your program crashes due to some invalid operation or access. I.e. programming error. This is neither Windows', nor the compiler's but your fault. You've got some bug in your program. You didn't show us your code so we can't tell you waht's wrong. But the obvious solution would be to run the program in a debugger and look for where it crashed.
2d
comment GLSL Standalone Shader Compiler
Note that Khronos is on the way of specifying a (rather high level) shader AST format, that would allow to "compile" shaders into something that spares the OpenGL driver from parsing (which is error prone – in fact I already found several bugs in NVidia's GLSL shader parser related to parsing number literals if a non-standard locale is loaded). Anyway, this AST is just there to decouple the language syntax from the driver implementation. So you'd have one standard reference parser-AST generator which very good diagnostics for everything that can be caught statically.
2d
comment How to draw a trajectory using opengl in a way that it appears to be dynamically drawn?
@SidharthKamboj: You have to unproject your window position (gluUnProject is your friend, though with modern OpenGL you probably want a non-GLU version). Remember that you only get 2 values, but you have so solve for a system of 3 independent variables (x, y and z). So what you get is not a point, but a ray into your scene. To do this you unproject the same x and y window coordinates but for different depth. This gives you 2 points between which the ray extends and beyond. You then have to intersect that ray with your scene.
2d
comment How to draw a trajectory using opengl in a way that it appears to be dynamically drawn?
@SidharthKamboj: I think it would be more instructive for you to try to understand what I did. If you explained it, you may read the explanation think "oh! I got it!" but there's a certain probability that you actually didn't get it. I'm not trying to be a dick here, but I sense that you're not yet accustomed to "think like a computer"; there are people who can do that naturally it seems, but others have to train it. I think you may fall into the second category. So I prescribe you a little exercise. Try to figure it out, that's the fun part :)
Oct
22
comment Max array size in c?
@JoachimPileborg: While we're at nickpicking, the variable gets initialized to all elements zero, which by the definition is the behavior for everything in the .bss segment. So the compiler can see, that the explicit initialization just does the same as placing it in bss and may choose to do so. Well actually it's the linker's choice if we get really nitpicky.
Oct
22
comment Max array size in c?
@AdrianoRepetti: No, not really. global variables are not allocated on the heap and not on the stack. They're allocated from the .bss segment, which is a completely different kind of beast. Note that "stack" "heap" and ".bss" are not termed by the C standard.
Oct
22
comment OpenGL what does glTexImage2D do?
+1 – why can't I upvote 50 times ;)
Oct
22
comment OpenGL what does glTexImage2D do?
@Fra: Texture mapping is not breaking things down into tiles. Having said that, the bleeding-edge technology is to go the other way round, i.e. merge lots of small texture tiles into one large (sparse) texture. Modern GPUs have memory management units and can fetch required portions of textures from CPU memory when needed and swap out the not required parts on demand. However you need a fairly recent GPU (2012-ish or later) for this to be supported. If you want to tile down a large image into smaller tiles, every tile must become an individual texture, or you use a 2D texture array.
Oct
22
comment Does multiple isolated OpenGL context affect performance
@TwilightSun: Good heavens, how old is your target device OpenGL implementation if it doesn't support PBOs? That feature is ancient stuff, supported by everything that's less than 10 years old. You may have to use an OpenGL extension, but you'll hard pressed to find an implementation that doesn't support it these days.
Oct
21
comment Finding supported GLSL version
@CAMOBAP: While in theory you could get this information by query-polling OpenGL contexts and GLSL compiler supported versions, the canonical way is to simply read the documentation. At opengl.org/registry you can download the specifications of each OpenGL standard and associated specification standards (like GLSL) and each standard defines which version of OpenGL it has been written against. For example the GLSL-4.50 specification states on page 1: "All OpenGL Graphics System Specification references in this specification are to version 4.5".
Oct
20
comment link OpenGL to Qt Creator under Mac osx
@Anouss: That just adds the QtOpenGL module, not the MacOS-X OpenGL framework, which is a separate thing.
Oct
19
comment Texture Mapping without OpenGL
Essentially you have to recreating what OpenGL does internally. Texture coordinates is something you have to somehow come up with (either specify them explicitly with the model or generate them based on e.g. the model's geometry). OpenGL requires to be supplied with texture coordinates either. The rest is actually quite basic stuff. I suggest you read the OpenGL-1.4 specification on texture application, namely how the fixed function pipeline does it. While the slides don't explain each and every step, but they carry all the information you need, given one knows how e.g. interpolation works.
Oct
18
comment error C7531: global function inverse requires
You do realize, that the error message already tells you exactly what to do…? Hint after the #version … line, add another line, with what the GLSL compiler suggested.
Oct
18
comment glCallList with slick-util
@Iggy: Binding textures in display lists works just fine. I think the people who struggled doing it were by accident putting the glBindTexture call within a glBegin/glEnd block which never was legal. Texture binding is a feature that got introduced only with OpenGL-1.1. Before that there was no texture binding at all, and instead you'd call glTexImage within a display list to somehow get the same effect (the wglShareLists function is named due to that).
Oct
18
comment glCallList with slick-util
@Iggy: Please rephrase your answer, that the display list creation code lacked the binding of the texture. Because display lists are perfectly capable of storing that. In fact waaay back with OpenGL-1.0 when there were no texture objects but a glTexImage function, display lists were ab-/used as texture storage, by putting the call to glTexImage inside a display list.