Reputation
1,569
Top tag
Next privilege 2,000 Rep.
Edit questions and answers
Badges
7 17
Impact
~96k people reached

Jan
28
comment Xcode evaluating expressions while debugging
What's "po"? The gdb console will let you evaluate a large set of arbitrary functions. What in particular where you trying to do?
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
The key information here isn't "you own something you get by init, copy or which you retain." The key information is "a collection ups the retain count when it stores an item, and releases it when it's done with it, and nothing else. If you 'owned' it before, you still do." That statement, in that manner, would help people's understanding.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Again, it's about the definition of ownership. You have to dig deep to grok that ownership isn't really ownership. Because it's not. You only truly own an object if you are the only controller. In the case of a collection, it adds to the retain count, meaning both you and the collection "own" it. The problem isn't whether TFM says what you should do, it's whether it's quick and clear. Yes, if I had read every page of the memory management guide, I would find this out. Like a lot of people, I'm tight for time, so I read enough to get me by.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Kevin: The quote above doesn't clearly define ownership. Neither does the Memory Management guide, though it does provide an invaluable example of the special case of collections, so thank you for reminding me about that. The important idea here is that ownership is defined as "having retained the item", and more importantly when an Collection "takes ownership", it's not doing anything other than sending it a retain message. For instance, it isn't taking ownership the way a human might take ownership of a car when buying it.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Dave: that still doesn't answer my question. A release message doesn't get rid of an object, it just decrements its retain count. If it's higher than 0, it sticks around.
Jan
27
answered In which situations must I retain an object?
Jan
27
comment Objective C - Naming Outlets and Actions via a Database
Yes, you can set the "userInteractionEnabled" property to NO.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Dave, the precise problem I had was whether a collection takes ownership of a stored object, or adds to it.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
So a good way to think about collections is that you and the collection have joint custody of the object, and it doesn't go away until both of you release it.
Jan
27
accepted Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Jan
27
asked Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Jan
27
comment Does this code leak?
Yeah, I'm wondering if viewWillDisappear is guaranteed to be called.
Jan
27
comment Does this code leak?
They don't say it very well, but an NSArray releases all of its contents when you release it. Supposedly.
Jan
27
answered Objective C - Naming Outlets and Actions via a Database
Jan
27
answered Including a library (lsusb) in a C program
Jan
27
comment Objective C - Help with changing background color when UIButton is pressed
Yep. It what one wants most of the time. The UIButton is really just a view with some methods to make it a responder.
Jan
27
answered Objective C - Help with changing background color when UIButton is pressed
Jan
26
answered How to optimize a for loop?
Jan
26
revised iPhone SDK - Call Objective C function
added 349 characters in body
Jan
26
answered iPhone SDK - Call Objective C function