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Feb
1
comment uiwebview ,objective c
I'd start with this, use some of the string manipulation functions to filter out the stuff you don't want, construct a new page (you'll need something to replace the framework you are removing, probably just <html> and <body> pairs), and then run it into loadHTMLString:baseURL: in your webView.
Feb
1
comment uiwebview ,objective c
When you make a request to an HTML server, you get a single 'file', which then might cause other files to be loaded, such as images, and whatnot. So, all you are getting is HTML content. Is it that you want the "interesting content" versus the header stuff and navigation and whatnot?
Feb
1
comment uiwebview ,objective c
Do you want to get the raw html?
Feb
1
comment uiwebview ,objective c
Could you clean up the presentation of the code a bit? This is pretty hard to read. Just stick 4 spaces in front of each line. The preview window will show you what it's going to look like.
Jan
31
comment Strange UI View Animation Effect
Yeah, it looks like the touch your choice button is starting off in the middle.
Jan
31
comment Strange UI View Animation Effect
What do you expect happen?
Jan
31
comment Strange UI View Animation Effect
The setAnimationDidStopSelector looks weird, it's not clear you need to set it inside a loop, since I think it only gets called after the commitAnimation.
Jan
28
answered Objective-C & Interface Builder for Dummies: How mix different controllers and transition between them?
Jan
28
comment ViewController - how to use it properly?
You want a viewController to have a particular concern. It's perfectly reasonable for it to control many views, but you'd want them all to be very related. The groupings you have are good ones, and Phix makes a good point about the navigation controller.
Jan
28
comment String to float in objective c
Hehe, you answered another question I had floating around in my head.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Because the MMPG starts the article on Collections with: "When you add an object to a collection such as an array, dictionary, or set, the collection takes ownership of it." and then goes and contradicts the meaning of the word ownership. The proper analogy is the machine power lockouts which people use to prevent others from powering on a machine before they are ready. This is hard, because you need to spend time explaining it, but ownership most people understand to be 100% complete control of the thing, so it's confusing.
Jan
28
answered how to disable caching on few pages, so as to avoid double submission of forms
Jan
28
comment Xcode evaluating expressions while debugging
Ah, that's why I've not heard of it. Fun.
Jan
28
comment When to release instance variables in objective c
If you need to retain these ivars, you might want to alloc them in a farther out context, such as the init of the object which this method is from.
Jan
28
comment Xcode evaluating expressions while debugging
What's "po"? The gdb console will let you evaluate a large set of arbitrary functions. What in particular where you trying to do?
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
The key information here isn't "you own something you get by init, copy or which you retain." The key information is "a collection ups the retain count when it stores an item, and releases it when it's done with it, and nothing else. If you 'owned' it before, you still do." That statement, in that manner, would help people's understanding.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Again, it's about the definition of ownership. You have to dig deep to grok that ownership isn't really ownership. Because it's not. You only truly own an object if you are the only controller. In the case of a collection, it adds to the retain count, meaning both you and the collection "own" it. The problem isn't whether TFM says what you should do, it's whether it's quick and clear. Yes, if I had read every page of the memory management guide, I would find this out. Like a lot of people, I'm tight for time, so I read enough to get me by.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Kevin: The quote above doesn't clearly define ownership. Neither does the Memory Management guide, though it does provide an invaluable example of the special case of collections, so thank you for reminding me about that. The important idea here is that ownership is defined as "having retained the item", and more importantly when an Collection "takes ownership", it's not doing anything other than sending it a retain message. For instance, it isn't taking ownership the way a human might take ownership of a car when buying it.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Dave: that still doesn't answer my question. A release message doesn't get rid of an object, it just decrements its retain count. If it's higher than 0, it sticks around.
Jan
27
answered In which situations must I retain an object?