1,494 reputation
616
bio website hacksaw.org
location United States
age 49
visits member for 3 years, 9 months
seen Aug 1 at 20:23

Trying hard to be no longer a sys-admin.

iPhone development is my current study.

Mini Resume: I've worked with computers for 33 years, doing some coding and a lot of systems administration.

OSes: TRS-80, TRS-DOS, Atari, ZX81, Mac OS 4-10, Various Unixes, BSDs, and Linuxes.

Coded in: BASIC, Fortran, Assembler (Z-80), Pascal, C, Forth, LISP, Postscript, C++, Objective-C, Python, Perl, various shells, Ruby.

I also write music, fiction, non-fiction, and the odd poem. I'm known to design things, largely in Adobe Illustrator.

I'm familiar with Agile:Scrum, and CMM.


Jan
31
comment Strange UI View Animation Effect
The setAnimationDidStopSelector looks weird, it's not clear you need to set it inside a loop, since I think it only gets called after the commitAnimation.
Jan
28
comment ViewController - how to use it properly?
You want a viewController to have a particular concern. It's perfectly reasonable for it to control many views, but you'd want them all to be very related. The groupings you have are good ones, and Phix makes a good point about the navigation controller.
Jan
28
comment String to float in objective c
Hehe, you answered another question I had floating around in my head.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Because the MMPG starts the article on Collections with: "When you add an object to a collection such as an array, dictionary, or set, the collection takes ownership of it." and then goes and contradicts the meaning of the word ownership. The proper analogy is the machine power lockouts which people use to prevent others from powering on a machine before they are ready. This is hard, because you need to spend time explaining it, but ownership most people understand to be 100% complete control of the thing, so it's confusing.
Jan
28
comment Xcode evaluating expressions while debugging
Ah, that's why I've not heard of it. Fun.
Jan
28
comment When to release instance variables in objective c
If you need to retain these ivars, you might want to alloc them in a farther out context, such as the init of the object which this method is from.
Jan
28
comment Xcode evaluating expressions while debugging
What's "po"? The gdb console will let you evaluate a large set of arbitrary functions. What in particular where you trying to do?
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
The key information here isn't "you own something you get by init, copy or which you retain." The key information is "a collection ups the retain count when it stores an item, and releases it when it's done with it, and nothing else. If you 'owned' it before, you still do." That statement, in that manner, would help people's understanding.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
Again, it's about the definition of ownership. You have to dig deep to grok that ownership isn't really ownership. Because it's not. You only truly own an object if you are the only controller. In the case of a collection, it adds to the retain count, meaning both you and the collection "own" it. The problem isn't whether TFM says what you should do, it's whether it's quick and clear. Yes, if I had read every page of the memory management guide, I would find this out. Like a lot of people, I'm tight for time, so I read enough to get me by.
Jan
28
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Kevin: The quote above doesn't clearly define ownership. Neither does the Memory Management guide, though it does provide an invaluable example of the special case of collections, so thank you for reminding me about that. The important idea here is that ownership is defined as "having retained the item", and more importantly when an Collection "takes ownership", it's not doing anything other than sending it a retain message. For instance, it isn't taking ownership the way a human might take ownership of a car when buying it.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Dave: that still doesn't answer my question. A release message doesn't get rid of an object, it just decrements its retain count. If it's higher than 0, it sticks around.
Jan
27
comment Objective C - Naming Outlets and Actions via a Database
Yes, you can set the "userInteractionEnabled" property to NO.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
@Dave, the precise problem I had was whether a collection takes ownership of a stored object, or adds to it.
Jan
27
comment Init an object, then store it into an NSArray. Is this going to be a leak?
So a good way to think about collections is that you and the collection have joint custody of the object, and it doesn't go away until both of you release it.
Jan
27
comment Does this code leak?
Yeah, I'm wondering if viewWillDisappear is guaranteed to be called.
Jan
27
comment Does this code leak?
They don't say it very well, but an NSArray releases all of its contents when you release it. Supposedly.
Jan
27
comment Objective C - Help with changing background color when UIButton is pressed
Yep. It what one wants most of the time. The UIButton is really just a view with some methods to make it a responder.
Jan
24
comment Where does the init *really* happen in a UIView placed in Interface builder?
Now to go read in greater depth and see if I want to do this in a different place. Thanks everyone, this was one of those flash frustrations which narrows your view, which blinded me to an answer that was inches away. Thanks for your patience.
Jan
24
comment Where does the init *really* happen in a UIView placed in Interface builder?
Awesome, works now.
Jan
23
comment XCode doesn't finish test build while at “Run Script” phase
Thanks for this tip, Logan.