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Jul
6
comment c++ passing a string literal instead of a const std::string&?
@MilesRout Yes, it should have been ... 4 years ago.
Jun
14
awarded  Nice Answer
May
7
comment Doubly linked list insert and display and search and remove
@Caleb True. I'll update accordingly.
May
7
answered Doubly linked list insert and display and search and remove
Apr
11
comment C++11 round off error using pow() and std::complex
In general, floating point numbers are not precise. They are within a margin of error (epsilon) of the "correct" value. However, since 0 can be stored in a double explicitly, I suspect that the difference has to do with the formula used to create the result.
Apr
11
answered type cast to integer
Apr
11
comment How to make a std::vector type-safe
@PortMan "I have several different "object types" that are not interchangable, but which are all stored as a vector<int>." This is an indication of an XY problem. The real problem is how you are storing your data.
Apr
11
comment How to make a std::vector type-safe
So you want something that is a vector, but you don't want someone else to accidentally use it as a vector? What would be the purpose in that?
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
@chris Perhaps we can get Pete Becker to chime in, but my hunch is that it is a bug in the g++ parsing of this (non-useful) line. Alternatively, it could simply be ignoring the non-useful line.
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
@Constructor That is my point. You are effectively doing the same thing ... with a function pointer declaration (stating the type, but never providing a name).
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
@chris I imagine it has to do with the parsing of it. Seems like it is a bug in g++ while clang and VS are providing the proper error.
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
int(*)(); is like typing int; or int*; ... That is, you start declaring a variable type, but never name it.
Apr
11
comment Naked pointer to unique_ptr
This appears to be an XY problem. The OP is storing a iterator/pointer to an internal address it does not own (and could potentially be invalid if the state of the vector changes). Chances are this is really a design problem - what is the actual problem you are trying to solve?
Mar
31
comment Alternative to std::string in C#
I think what you are looking for is the Chars method.
Mar
24
comment Blowfish encryption algorythm explained
@user3325976 I would recommend you invest in Applied Cryptography to get started.
Mar
23
comment Blowfish encryption algorythm explained
If you read the key_schedule function of the link you provided, you would see where the encryption occurs. The encrypt function operating on 2 consecutive words in the block.
Mar
20
comment Compress/uncompress data in memory
The zlib implementation is open-source, and I believe it is already part of the android libraries.
Mar
19
comment get the maximum value of enumeration constants at compile time
@lizusek One method for doing so, yes.
Mar
19
comment get the maximum value of enumeration constants at compile time
@vlad_tepesch This is true. If you do not have control over the enumeration, you can also create your own enumeration that stores the minimum and maximum values of the existing enumeration. Anytime the existing enumeration changes, you will have to make the corresponding changes to your enumeration.
Mar
19
answered get the maximum value of enumeration constants at compile time