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seen Nov 18 at 17:43

Nov
18
comment double exp(double) unexpectedly returns NaN (no float overflow)
@LThode I specified "in this circumstance" - you are speaking in general.
Nov
14
comment double exp(double) unexpectedly returns NaN (no float overflow)
@LThode The difference between NaN and Inf (in this circumstance) is minute. Both are going to throw a math exception, and both are the result of bad input somewhere along the way.
Oct
30
comment fstream !fail() and is_open()
@ACK_stoverflow I would view that as improper usage of the word "reuse" in a software context. Resetting the data is simply continuing to use the same instance. Code reuse would imply it is in a function that gets called with a different parameter to output to a different file, for example. Legitimate? That is kind of open-ended. It definitely makes the code less readable and harder to debug - and you are not likely to have any sort of code optimization happening because of it. All-in-all, I would avoid resetting the stream to use it for a different purpose.
Oct
1
comment VS2013 Changing AppPool to classic mode in IISExpress no longer works
This doesn't really fix the issue if you need to run in Classic mode instead of Integrated mode.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Aug
21
awarded  Nice Answer
Jul
6
comment c++ passing a string literal instead of a const std::string&?
@MilesRout Yes, it should have been ... 4 years ago.
Jun
14
awarded  Nice Answer
May
7
comment Doubly linked list insert and display and search and remove
@Caleb True. I'll update accordingly.
May
7
answered Doubly linked list insert and display and search and remove
Apr
11
comment C++11 round off error using pow() and std::complex
In general, floating point numbers are not precise. They are within a margin of error (epsilon) of the "correct" value. However, since 0 can be stored in a double explicitly, I suspect that the difference has to do with the formula used to create the result.
Apr
11
answered type cast to integer
Apr
11
comment How to make a std::vector type-safe
@PortMan "I have several different "object types" that are not interchangable, but which are all stored as a vector<int>." This is an indication of an XY problem. The real problem is how you are storing your data.
Apr
11
comment How to make a std::vector type-safe
So you want something that is a vector, but you don't want someone else to accidentally use it as a vector? What would be the purpose in that?
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
@chris Perhaps we can get Pete Becker to chime in, but my hunch is that it is a bug in the g++ parsing of this (non-useful) line. Alternatively, it could simply be ignoring the non-useful line.
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
@Constructor That is my point. You are effectively doing the same thing ... with a function pointer declaration (stating the type, but never providing a name).
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
@chris I imagine it has to do with the parsing of it. Seems like it is a bug in g++ while clang and VS are providing the proper error.
Apr
11
comment Strange code that compiles with g++
int(*)(); is like typing int; or int*; ... That is, you start declaring a variable type, but never name it.
Apr
11
comment Naked pointer to unique_ptr
This appears to be an XY problem. The OP is storing a iterator/pointer to an internal address it does not own (and could potentially be invalid if the state of the vector changes). Chances are this is really a design problem - what is the actual problem you are trying to solve?
Mar
31
comment Alternative to std::string in C#
I think what you are looking for is the Chars method.