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Oct
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Notable Question
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awarded  Popular Question
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Apr
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awarded  Commentator
Apr
11
comment jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
I've re-framed the question, posted the bits of code that seem to be the culprit. Unfortunately I cannot post the actual code as it's internal to my company.
Apr
11
revised jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
fixing bad paste
Apr
11
comment jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
I have tried attaching from the body without success. As I commented a moment ago, it would appear a call to $("#domain").attr("disabled", "disabled") in the #domain handler is the source of my trouble, although I do not see anything in the jQuery documentation to explain why.
Apr
11
comment jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
@minitech Upon further investigation I discovered that my original question was insufficient to describe the failure case (i.e. everyone said "works for me"), so I re-created it to fill in the sufficient context. Was that improper etiquette?
Apr
11
comment jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
It would appear $("#domain").attr("disabled", "disabled"); in the "specific" handler is the source of the problem. Are events not bubbled for "disabled" elements?
Apr
11
revised jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
clarifying reason why first syntax isn't usable
Apr
11
asked jQuery 1.7.1 $(document).on delegation does not work with selector on disabled element
Jan
15
awarded  Supporter
Dec
23
comment Java regex alternation operator “|” behavior seems broken
Thanks much. I'm disappointed I can't force Java to default to longest-match, but quite satisfied with the explanation of why, and the workarounds you both provided.
Dec
23
accepted Java regex alternation operator “|” behavior seems broken
Dec
23
comment Java regex alternation operator “|” behavior seems broken
I don't claim that Java made a claim to be compliant to a standard, I'm just shocked that "longest match" isn't what it does in alternation, because it should be the default in any lexing. It's actually orthogonal to the semantics of alternation. So my question is still: is there a way to force it?
Dec
23
comment Java regex alternation operator “|” behavior seems broken
I understand the approach you're taking with your response, but these are just a couple of 'fake' examples synthesized to show the problem. If my actual problem was matching "six|sixty", you're right, that'd be the way to do it. But the real problem is that Java's behavior is inconsistent with the standard behavior for the last 30 years or so. I'm interested in seeing if I can fix that, not in making a smarter regex for the sample code.
Dec
23
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