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May
8
comment Replacing a define with a “test” define in CppUTest
You could switch to C++, which has reference variables. Short of that, you'll have to replace PORTA_CONFIG with a point variable, e.g., volatile unsigned int *PORTA_CONFIG_ADDR and change all references to PORTA_CONFIG to use the pointer variable.
May
6
comment using qsort in C
@SergioFormiggini Yes, it's a common erroneous belief. Hopefully it hasn't killed many people.
May
6
comment C: Having an issue with scope
My point is obvious to anyone who isn't making a concerted effort to miss it. As I already said, "Fixing this one way or the other gets different results for a." It's supposed to be a test, but even the most competent programmer only has a 50-50 chance of passing it unless they already know the answer.
May
6
comment C: Having an issue with scope
@AlanAu But we only know that's the error because we know what the answer is supposed to be. If instead we assume that the typo is addOne(void) instead of addOne(int a) we get a different result.
May
6
comment C: Having an issue with scope
"so why would it take the a from the main rather than the if" -- Uh, so you don't understand scope at all? The top level int a is the one visible in addOne.
May
6
comment C: Having an issue with scope
Also you have all sorts of illegal characters in this so it can't be copied/pasted and compiled ... those quotes aren't quotes and the minus sign isn't a minus sign. As for Carcigenicate's comment, it's irrelevant ... this is an exam for testing understanding of scope, not an example of working code.
May
6
comment C: Having an issue with scope
"it should be solid" -- it's not. addOne is being passed an argument but it doesn't take one. Fixing this one way or the other gets different results for a. If this is really the code that the instructor handed out then the instructor is incompetent.
May
6
comment C: Having an issue with scope
`<stdio.h>' -- Please post legal C code.
May
5
comment using qsort in C
@SergioFormiggini Not just unsigned ... int - int can result in undefined behavior. This matters when sorting arrays of arbitrary ints that can differ by more than can fit in an int.
May
5
comment using qsort in C
@SergioFormiggini "If element->key is an integer, a float, a double or a char I think you may use the code: return element1->key - element2->key ;) " -- if you're fond of erroneous results due to overflow.
May
5
comment using qsort in C
"I can't. " -- Of course you can. "so shouldn't the compare func receive Element** also?" -- it should receive what the documentation says it should receive. "if i had to sort a regular array A* of Element types I'd have to use void* as you've saud" -- void* can point to anything ... an Element, an Element*, an Element**, an Element*** ...
May
5
comment using qsort in C
"Can anyone say what's wrong please.. ? I've tried so many patterns of altering that compare function and still nothing" -- Did you try reading the documentation? The qsort manual entry gives the signature of the comparison function: int cmp(const void *a, const void *b) ... yours doesn't have that signature.
May
5
comment Object reference not set to an instance of an object.Why doesn't .NET show which object is `null`?
The most helpful thing would be a stack trace showing, at each call level, exactly what line, in what file, resulted in the error. Oh, wait ... that's what it does now!
May
5
comment Object reference not set to an instance of an object.Why doesn't .NET show which object is `null`?
"couldn't it tell me which method was called that caused the error?" -- The debugger provides the file name and line number where the call occurs. That's all you need.
May
5
comment Object reference not set to an instance of an object.Why doesn't .NET show which object is `null`?
"It's kind off similar to .net exceptions not helping to point out which key does not exist in a dictionary." -- Actually it's not at all similar. if a key isn't in a dictionary, the key is in hand and can be included in an exception. In the case of a null reference, the only thing in hand is null.
May
5
comment Meshes: “Sorting/Reordering” Arrays Referencing Shared Entries of Another for Cache Efficiency
Carlton suggested Cuthill-McKee, which is a form of breadth-first search ... something along those lines would get better locality than just a linear pass. e.g., place the vertices of some polygon, then for each vertex, if any, shared with another polygon, place the vertices of that polygon, etc., until you've handled all the polygons.
May
5
comment Meshes: “Sorting/Reordering” Arrays Referencing Shared Entries of Another for Cache Efficiency
Depending on whether you move vertices already placed, you get either v1, v2, v3, v4, v783252 or v2, v3, v4, v1, v783252 ... either the first polygon or the last polygon will have all of its vertices together.
May
5
comment Meshes: “Sorting/Reordering” Arrays Referencing Shared Entries of Another for Cache Efficiency
At least the polygons that get their vertices together won't be "fighting" themselves. Do less speculation and more measurement.
May
5
comment Meshes: “Sorting/Reordering” Arrays Referencing Shared Entries of Another for Cache Efficiency
An obvious "rough heuristic" would be to just run through your polygons once, placing their vertices together. This will be even be optimal if no polygons share vertices.
May
4
comment How to get the shortest palindrome of a string
"I guess the purpose of the website is to suggest some one a solution and expect a improvement suggestion/comment. " -- I can't see how your comments -- especially "Incomplete implementation!" -- contribute in any way to that. Several correct answers, including mine and BiGYaN's, have been given to the OP's question. Claiming that an implementation is incomplete when it isn't, and posting sample strings that the answer handles correctly, does nothing positive.