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Mar
28
comment Structure with array of function pointer
@lodo Of course you can ... true is not a C keyword.
Mar
19
revised If your stack and heap are non-executable, how can your code run?
added 32 characters in body
Mar
18
comment how to create function inside another function in c#,is it possible?
P.S. I would note that this is a comment, not an answer to the question. -1
Mar
10
comment infinite While loop without statement
Edit 2: harper's answer goes beyond my comment, which omits his point 1 ... there may simply be nothing left to do until a reset, but halting the device is undesirable or not possible.
Mar
10
comment infinite While loop without statement
Other than the one from rabi shaw, the comments above are uninformed and generally wrong. The code will clearly run regardless of any condition being met, and isn't waiting for anything. And the host of an embedded application may have no operating system, no "sleep", and no resources to be consumed other than the power to run the CPU. The loop should be understood in terms of interrupts that do all the work. Edit: Matt's comment came after I wrote this. It's true that the behavior is undefined by the C standard, but that doesn't mean that it isn't defined by the implementation.
Mar
9
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
K&R did not base C on the PDP instruction set; Ritchie has refuted this rumor in print. Anyway it's irrelevant because this question was about why the C design used NUL-terminated strings, and the repeated harebrained claim by the OP that this was an "inferior" design. The rest of the comments above are also irrelevant, especially the one about VLAs. Now, SO is wisely telling us to avoid extended discussions ...
Mar
8
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
malloc manages the heap! That's not exposed to the programmer nor requires compiler support the way that it would be if every string had bytes before its address. Your reference to malloc is idiotic and intellectually dishonest. It's not about what people "complain about", it's about what it would require to use it ... malloc's stored length (actually, a pointer to the next block) doesn't require anything of anybody other than malloc. " was a sensible programmer-effort-versus-memory tradeoff for the 1970s" -- which is the topic here! Goodbye.
Mar
8
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
'I don't think "the char buffer begins with an int containing the length" is any more magical' -- it is if you're going to make str[n] refer to the right char. These are the sorts of things that the folks discussing this don't think about.
Mar
8
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
"that's most likely because they didn't want to spend much effort on string handling" -- nonsense; the entire application domain of early UNIX was string handling. If it hadn't been for that, we never would have heard of it.
Mar
8
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
This bit about the calling convention is a just-so story with no relation to reality ... it wasn't a consideration in the design. And register-based calling conventions had already been "invented". Also, approaches such as two pointers weren't an option because structs weren't first class ... only primitives were assignable or passable; struct copying didn't arrive until UNIX V7. Needing memcpy (which also didn't exist) just to copy a string pointer is a joke. Try writing a full program, not just isolated functions, if you're making a pretense of language design.
Mar
8
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
Ok, just one more thing: pointers to the beginning and end of a string would also provide that pointers into strings point to strings themselves, but they mean 3 more bytes per string, more time passing around two pointers instead of one, and a built in string type, as early C didn't even have struct copying built into the language.
Mar
8
comment What's the rationale for null terminated strings?
@supercat I've already explained why C literals cannot be represented as prefixed strings without a type and operator overloading ... str[n] yields the wrong char. And having the compiler allocate space at negative address offsets for the prefix is a nightmare. And only NUL-terminated strings provide that pointers into strings point to strings themselves ... an essential feature of early C string processing. In any case, NUL-terminated strings was not a bad design decision for the C language. And that's the last I'll say about this silliness.
Mar
8
comment C++ Type conversion error /
"input_st in the code shown is always an empty string" -- No it isn't; it's read from cin. (Although apparently that was a later edit.) "the function would call itself recursively. That is invalid logic." -- No it isn't.
Mar
8
comment C++ Type conversion error /
Recursion is bad because a malicious user can cause stack overflow.
Mar
8
revised C++ Type conversion error /
grammar, indenting
Mar
8
comment Why is repeated inheritance / duplicate inheritance invalid?
@bgoldst "I think my DoubleAgent example is a reasonable example of how it could make sense." -- You think wrong. Having an Agent and also an Agent makes sense and is useful ... they are different Agents. Being an Agent and also an Agent makes no sense and is useless. If the goal is to inherit two copies of Agent's members, then you're doing it wrong -- use composition. "not a justification for lack of support for this potentially useful feature." -- the justification is that it would be stupid to bloat C++ with such nonsense.
Mar
8
comment Why is repeated inheritance / duplicate inheritance invalid?
@bgoldst That's not an argument, it's just a preference. I daresay that most other people have a different preference -- that the language not be bloated with special syntax to handle such a rare case when existing syntax works very well. And there's a very long queue of other "built-in syntax" that has been proposed that would be of considerably more value.
Mar
8
comment Need advice with C++ pointers and character-arrays (C-strings)
I just explained to you why the first parameter is included ... the instructor's example code would not be valid without it. And nowhere does it say that the existing code should be removed; it's reasonable to assume that the code to output the values for A and B should be appended to the existing output.
Mar
8
comment Need advice with C++ pointers and character-arrays (C-strings)
The problem statement, as quoted by the OP, includes cout << str << endl; ... that uses the first parameter. It is also a strong hint to the students as to how to solve item A.
Mar
8
comment Need advice with C++ pointers and character-arrays (C-strings)
"I do not understand what is the sense to declare the first parameter when in fact it is not used in the function." -- Look again.