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May
5
comment Is there something simpler than `~isempty(x)` to cast a non-scalar `x` into a boolean scalar?
@xenoclast: both are important. Basically, I'm looking for the closest notational equivalent to what one can do in Python, as shown in the tl;dr version of my question.
Apr
27
comment Looking for convenient way to define lexically scoped aliases for functions
Thanks. Would you mind rewriting the snippet in my original post using one of the functions you mentioned?
Apr
17
comment How can I disable scientific notation when working with very large numbers in Perl?
Using printf "%.0f\n" to print big ints is a really bad idea. Note that the output you get in your last print out agrees with the output in the accepted answer only in the first 16 digits. If one is going to throw away so much precision, one may as well work with floats.
Apr
15
comment Perl's equivalent of Python's hash (or Java's hashCode) function?
@Quentin: thanks for your question; I've added a clarification to my post. In short, agreement with Python's hash is not necessary (though, now that you mention it, it would be kind of nice, but only as a pleasant bonus, not at all required).
Mar
14
comment Looking for selectAll-like operation that will include calling object in the selection (whenever it matches the selector)
@ee2Dev: wanted = parent.selectAll(.yuk) would contain more than is wanted, namely those elements that do not satisfy some_selector. Ditto for your second comment.
Mar
8
comment Can one specify a custom force function for a force-directed layout?
@LarsKotthoff: thanks again; I'll accept your comments as the answer if you post them as such.
Mar
8
comment Can one specify a custom force function for a force-directed layout?
@LarsKotthoff: thanks for the pointer. I just scanned the d3.js docs, but I was not able to find any documentation on creating custom layouts. I imagine that this involves something like d3.layout.myLayout = function () { ... }, but it's not at all clear to me what exactly this function should return. IOW, I can't find any documentation on the "layout interface". Of course, I could try to reverse-engineer the d3.js source, but my previous attempts to do this have been pretty traumatic, so I'd really prefer not to do this if possible.
Feb
3
comment How to reverse the `nbconvert --from python`?
@cel Indeed, it is first-world problem: I have RSI from mouse use; have needed surgery for both shoulders; my hatred of using the mouse has a medical basis. (Then again, I can't think of any problem posted in SO that is not a first-world problem.) Regarding your copy-paste suggestion: each homework entails filling 20-30 blanks with code. That's 20-30 copy-paste operations. No thanks. But thanks for the runipy pointer.
Jan
25
comment How to fix the width of textarea in number of characters? (cols attribute does NOT work)
This is NOT true: (a) I get exactly the same multipliers with Courier as I get with monospace. (b) on Safari, the text in your codepen spills over to the second line; it does not fit in one line with the specified width, which is consistent with the fact that I get greater multipliers for Safari than for, say, Chrome.
Jan
25
comment How to fix the width of textarea in number of characters? (cols attribute does NOT work)
@StephenThomas: I did set the textarea width in the relevant jsFiddles: jsfiddle.net/kynn/uj21Lqv4 and jsfiddle.net/kynn/ke41u0vp, which were included in my original post. Look at the HTML. And the problem I mentioned (significant cross-browser variance) is exactly the same with courier or monospace.
Jan
25
comment How to fix the width of textarea in number of characters? (cols attribute does NOT work)
This solution is described in excruciating detail in my post, down to specific multipliers for a couple of browsers. The only difference is that you used "Courier" while I used "monospace". The upshot is exactly the same. And so are my objections to it.
Jan
25
comment How to fix the width of textarea in number of characters? (cols attribute does NOT work)
@StephenThomas: the jsFiddle I posted uses a fixed width font.
Jan
25
comment How to fix the width of textarea in number of characters? (cols attribute does NOT work)
@StephenThomas: I already did what you propose, as described in considerable detail in my original post; I also explained in detail why this solution fails.
Nov
27
comment How to read org-mode documentation inside Emacs?
@phils: I'm intrigued by your suggestion, but I can't fill in the ... in your "(autoload ...)" reference. BTW, since abo-abo's answer worked for me, I conclude that the org-mode documentation is included in my Emacs installation, but I still don't understand why it does not show in the menu I get when I press C-h i (or C-h i d). Is there some configuration code I could add to my ~/.emacs that would add an item for org-mode to this menu?
Nov
25
comment How to read org-mode documentation inside Emacs?
@abo-abo: thanks a lot! i'd be happy to accept your comment as answer if you care to post it.
Nov
10
comment Puzzling type mismatch after removing signature labels
@Gilles: My understanding so far is that, in OCaml, if the author of the function chooses to use labels, then the user of the function is no longer entirely free to omit them. In contrast, in Python, if the author defines a function with def foo(x, y): ..., the user of that function may (entirely as a convenience), use foo(x=0, y=1), or foo(y=1, x=0), but can also always use just foo(0, 1). This is what I was referring to, and is what I imagine one means when one says "labels/keywords are a convenience to obviate the need to remember the order of arguments."
Nov
10
comment Puzzling type mismatch after removing signature labels
We have different ideas about what a "convenience" is. In my book a convenience is nice to have, but not mandatory. Since OCaml labels are sometimes mandatory, I would no longer consider them a mere "convenience". Python too has support for labeled arguments, but there's never a situation in which one absolutely has to use them. In this sense, Python's labeled arguments are a convenience; OCaml's, not so much, IMO.
Nov
10
comment Puzzling type mismatch after removing signature labels
@Marth: >ugh< that's ugly... thanks
Nov
10
comment On finding documentation
as I mentioned in my original question String.map and String.Map are completely different things. I have since then learned (from my offline exchange with ivg) that String.Map is not explicitly documented anywhere; it is, so to speak, a dynamic entity, rather than a lexical one. Thanks for the pointer on ocaml-doc; I'll definitely hunt it down (I'm on OS X); I have indeed been using Core, but I'm beginning to regret it. I don't mind that they override standard library functions, but I'm livid at discovering that sometimes they changed their signatures. Unforgivable.
Nov
10
comment How to reduce code clutter in this function?
@ivg: ok, got it. thanks!