Reputation
3,722
Top tag
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
1 12 30
Newest
 Civic Duty
Impact
~323k people reached

Mar
19
comment PowerShell: detecting errors in script functions
With the continue there, shouldn't there be a line saying ` end 2` in between the exception info and the line with begin 3? If not, why not?
Mar
16
revised How do I redirect output stream(s) to byte array in memory, for writing to an API
clarification
Mar
13
revised How do I redirect output stream(s) to byte array in memory, for writing to an API
revised title
Mar
13
asked How do I redirect output stream(s) to byte array in memory, for writing to an API
Mar
11
comment How to redirect powershell output when run from Task Scheduler?
yeah! +1 for that, even though I personally knew that already... seems worthy of specification for the question asked
Feb
25
comment How to concatenate strings and variables in Powershell?
surely there is a way to pipe the desired properties into an external file, then deserialize them into a string of components joined with hyphens(?)
Feb
24
awarded  Civic Duty
Feb
12
comment File Copy with Progress Bar
Boy, I hope this works well!!
Feb
12
comment What is the proper regular expression for an unescaped backslash before a character?
@LeonTimmermans and James - hey - I've come up with an expression, that at least when I benchmark it on RegexHero seems to be ~35-40% faster in .Net, if you're interested: (?<!(?<!\\)\\(\\\\)*)\\g -- it also only matches the character you want, rather than the entire expression (so, for \\\\\g, it will verify that \\\\\ is even numbered, then match \g -- I believe yours matches \\\\\g - didn't seem like that was desired(?)
Feb
9
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
I put my encoding scheme more or less into words in response to your referenced question, but that question does not take into account alphanumeric strings - only numbers encoded as strings - not sure if that was intentional, as your question seemed to be in response to this comment thread, and this thread talks about alphanumeric strings (?)
Feb
9
revised Space-efficient way to encode numbers as sortable strings
advantages and caveat sections
Feb
9
answered Space-efficient way to encode numbers as sortable strings
Feb
9
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
ah - good to know that too, I saw the limit for a varchar - in general perhaps ? - as 8,000, but 900 should still be enough.
Feb
9
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
ah - this MIGHT work... somehow I thought the limit on a varchar was in the 250 range, but 8,000 should be plenty of space to give - what I need to do now is figure out if I want to use my encoding scheme, which would be more processing, or use more space to store the sort value
Feb
9
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
Though it would achieve the ordering I need, I can't think that padding the numbers could be made to be dependable enough, because the numbers could be every other character, thus making something like a1b2c3d4e5 into a0000001b0000002c0000003d0000004e0000005 - I could of course make the sort field big enough to handle this situation with 10 padding digits, but that would lack support for 11 or 12 digit numbers... However I am working toward creating a "sort" column, so it can be indexed, and I think I've come up with an encoding scheme - I have a feeling it will need an answer of my own
Feb
6
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
@blam within the context of programming in general, this is not a magic sort. Most procedural languages do not support it natively, but there is an implementation freely available for each of them, usually with some sort of commentary on how it's not perfect, or doesn't account for something, and/or is not efficient. The most common name for these is "natural" SQL is not a procedural language, and T-SQL is not recommended for processing lots of loops, which are AFAIK necessary for this sort of algorithm. I can't find, but could use, and am trying to determine a SQL solution.
Feb
6
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
This information could be determined with a procedural language, using any combination of many many algorithms freely available on the internet, either in a bulk process, on entry, on demand during sorting, just prior to display - whatever makes the most sense. The data is currently in a SQL Server Database table, lumped into a single field and is being displayed in the wild, to customers, but is not being sorted according to customer expectations. If SQL Server had this capability, that would be ideal. It doesn't. What is the closest we can get to that ideal solution? What are the drawbacks?
Feb
6
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
@blam I assume you mean the posted question (?) Not sure what you're saying is inconsistent (?). If the user navigates to a list of ten books (via search or category narrowing or whatever) containing cook books themed on egg recipes and is viewing a summary list, that list should be sortable by, among other things, title. These titles have numbers in them. The bookseller is not going to require the authors to rename their books, set a short limit on title length or enter in meta data to describe how the books should be sorted. This information needs to be determined automatically.
Feb
6
revised Natural sort for SQL Server
added link to coding horror article
Feb
6
comment Natural sort for SQL Server
@SeanLange key as in "highly utilized by users of the system". Not as in "unique in the design of the database"