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seen Mar 26 at 14:13

Aug
2
comment How do I write a ZipN-like function in F#?
Also, this solution is tail recursive :) It handles very long input fine (e.g. ll = [ [1..100000]; [1..100000]), which would definitely cause a stack overflow otherwise!
Aug
2
comment How do I write a ZipN-like function in F#?
I forget to mention why you should be careful. When you skip items in a list, you can just repeatedly discard the head element. However, Seq.skip creates a thunk referencing the original sequence, with the instruction “skip n elements”. This has to be executed every time the sequence is enumerated, and is obviously slower. Seq.append has similar problems.
Apr
11
comment Turn this code into LINQ
The first from _ in _ becomes ….GoodsItems.SelectMany(goodsItem => goodsItem.Comments.Where(…)) and then you have .Select(c => CreateFreeText(c).ToString()). The official advice would be to use the query syntax and I think they're right here! Hope that helps anyway.
Apr
11
comment Turn this code into LINQ
@Magnus Technically, we already have a lambda in this one ;). If you wanted to put this into method syntax (which is what the compiler does anyway), it'd go something like this.
Mar
26
comment Invert nested dictionaries in f# Map<'a,Map<'b,'T>>) -> Map<'b,Map<'a,'T>>
In hindsight, that last comment really didn't give enough detail to be useful. Yes @nicolas, I used the Stopwatch class from the System.Diagnostics namespace for timing, running each test multiple times and averaging their runtimes. This was where the sizes of the inner and outer dictionaries were equal. The speedup also seems to reduce as the sizes of the dictionaries increases – this starts off over twice as fast, but decreases to about 25% faster for the largest sizes I tested.
Apr
22
comment How to find the value in a list at which a maximum value of a function occurs
Thanks @ildjarn, you're quite right – I wasn't so much after the pair (x, f x) as the value x. My mistake here was the poor choice of an example where these values happen to coincide, plus seeing a wrong example online which led me to believe that List.maxBy returned the maximum value after the function had been applied (i.e. did list |> List.map f |> List.max). The MSDN documentation is quite clear on the subject so I haven't really got any excuses!