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Apr
21
comment How to recursively substitute a list of tuple pairs?
Note that it will lead to max recursion error in the case when the data itself implies a circular relationship, such as the example in my other comment.
Apr
21
comment How to recursively substitute a list of tuple pairs?
What if the structure implied by the data is itself recursive? Such as [(232, [230, 231]), (231, [214, 215]), (215, [232])] -- it seems like you can't have a general solution without a ton of extra assumptions (keep in mind that it could be arbitrarily far from the beginning that a cycle of data recursion begins, you can't check that property without visiting all of the data). Even just computing the root is tricky. It seems like the data ought to be stored in a database according to some relationships that make this computation easy (if this computation is indeed necessary).
Apr
20
comment Numpy Vector (N,1) dimension -> (N,) dimension conversion
It looks like someone came through and downvoted the non-accepted answers without leaving any comments. Probably a troll.
Apr
18
comment Python large multi-list efficient query
@dbliss csv.reader returns a file iterator, so it will only consume data from the file on demand, akin to lazy evaluation from a functional language or similar. When you say "csv.reader returns something, and the whole of what it returns is not needed" this belies an assumption that it is pre-emptively fetching data, which it isn't. The actual reader object itself is extremely minimal and has nothing to do with the data, other than iterating it on demand.
Apr
11
awarded  Fanatic
Apr
9
revised Fast (but not very accurate) Method for Finding Distance between 2 Points using Python and Pandas
edited body
Apr
9
answered Fast (but not very accurate) Method for Finding Distance between 2 Points using Python and Pandas
Apr
9
comment Fast (but not very accurate) Method for Finding Distance between 2 Points using Python and Pandas
In the clustering case, you might also want to calculate true distances for all pairs in the same cluster (for each cluster) so that those points don't have effective distance of zero. This is also amenable to simple parallelization: give each process a copy of the data (or have it load a copy) along with a list of indices that it is responsible for. Then that process computes pairwise distance of those indices against all other indices, and writes them somewhere. With only millions of rows, this should be reasonable on modest hardware.
Apr
9
comment Fast (but not very accurate) Method for Finding Distance between 2 Points using Python and Pandas
You could also consider constructing a k-d tree out of the data, rather than storing it in a relational structure like a DataFrame. Then it would be cheap to get neighbors of a given point, and perhaps you could only calculate distances on demand. Does the application always need every pair? Yet another option could be to cluster the points and use each cluster's centroid/mean as a proxy. Then the distance between any two points would be approximated by the distance between only the cluster centers. It's speculative whether anything fancy like this is really better than brute force though.
Apr
9
comment Fast (but not very accurate) Method for Finding Distance between 2 Points using Python and Pandas
A better approach than approximation would be to profile the function to get a sense of exactly why it takes too long, followed by using ctypes/Cython/numba to translate the function as-is into a C function that runs without as much overhead. You may need to modify your calling convention to use the numpy array values of data underlying each pandas Series column of data, and you can also checkout numpy.ctypeslib for easy conversion from a numpy array to a ctypes-compatible array. It seems like a lot, but really it's a pretty easy way to access C functions in Python.
Apr
8
comment Example to understand scipy basin hopping optimization function
If that whole thing doesn't accept, then the adaptive stepper adjusts downward by a factor of 0.9, and you'll uniformly draw a sample from [0.55, 1.45] (from the original point again, having still a 0.5 chance of not being in the interval). I do agree that this alone, with enough repeated draws, makes the probability infinitesimal that no such draw was inside of [0,1]. It is curious in reading the code how it is even possible that it outputs the answer the OP gives, rather than always the initial point.
Apr
8
comment Example to understand scipy basin hopping optimization function
No that's not right. The algorithm picks x0 + delta and then, whether in bounds or not, executes the local deterministic optimizer from that point (which runs away to minus infinity in this case). After it hits the maximum iteration limit (or in other cases, when it finds an optimum), then it checks if it's in bounds and whether it improves the fitness function or not, and does Metropolis accept/reject (you can see it here).
Apr
8
awarded  Nice Answer
Apr
6
comment Example to understand scipy basin hopping optimization function
I agree that the local optimizer is taking points and running with them which always leads to something the bounds will reject. I'm just saying even if this wasn't true, the underlying idea of basically rejection sampling an otherwise-Metropolis algorithm with some bounds is the bigger conceptual problem. As one commenter wrote, you could instead add a constraint to penalize proposals outside of the range, which gives up guaranteed rejection of out-of-bounds points, but also allows probability that the algorithm will favor being in the bounds in the end.
Apr
6
comment Example to understand scipy basin hopping optimization function
Actually, if you look at the source code is quite a bit more complicated than that. Firstly, it uses a uniform draw for the random displacement and with the defaults it will be uniform on [-0.5, 0.5], meaning based on the OP's initial value there's a 50/50 chance the point won't be in the interval initially, and then the local optimizer will take it and run with it. The code also uses a dubious class called AdaptiveStepsize which geometrically reduces the step by 0.9 if encountering a too-low accept rate.
Apr
5
comment PCA in machine learning
On the other hand, what would it accomplish to take data you've already separated and perform PCA locally in that region of feature-space? In that case, you would be implicitly saying that it is not the global feature properties that act to distinguish data, but instead it is the local variation conditioned on being in the part of feature space for that class. I believe methods like Locally Linear Embedding (and ISOMAP too which I mentioned) are meant to handle this, and in general these routines don't require (and in fact don't want) to be re-fitted on each local class.
Apr
5
comment PCA in machine learning
If the classes are meaningfully different from each other, like different clusters, this will be apparent if you learn the most informative basis from among the entire data set. Then coefficient vectors will put them naturally into their different clustered areas of the transformed space. The trouble will be whether a projection down into a lower dimension (usually the point of PCA) causes you to lose some discriminative ability by essentially mapping different clusters on top of one another, clobbering them. An alternate approach meant to handle this is ISOMAP.
Apr
5
comment PCA in machine learning
@Learner Yes, the last thing. You should have a training set that embodies all knowledge you are able to have prior to testing and/or encountering new in-the-wild data. Find the most explanatory basis for that entire set of data, and then re-use it every time you encounter new test or in-the-wild data that needs to be transformed into its associated set of basis coefficients. If it's computationally challenging, you can also do randomized PCA by drawing a smaller data set uniformly from the combined set of all epochs. With a reasonable sample size, randomized PCA is a good approximation.
Apr
3
comment Python multi-threading
It might just be easier to use tools that do this for you out of the box, like pylab or pyplot (e.g. setting the interactive mode with ion()), or the IPython notebook. I doubt homebrewing your own with manual use of threading is going to help in light of Python's GIL.
Apr
3
comment Python multi-threading
Why is it a good idea to use threads?