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Feb
19
comment Constructor accessibility C# compiler error CS0122 vs CS1729
Yes, that's a correct analysis. In this case there are two potential diagnostics that could be reported depending on how overload resolution is implemented, but CS1729 is definitely the better one for the user. Note that this in the IDE experience this is very much a heuristic. We ensure that Go to Definition would still go to A.Test.Test(int) because it's not clear how the user might deal with the problem. Do they want to remove the parameter and make the constructor public, or do they want to add an argument at the call site? Fun stuff. :-)
Feb
19
comment Constructor accessibility C# compiler error CS0122 vs CS1729
@Jeppe Stig Nielen -- yes, you are correct. That is clearly a bug. I tweaked my response to make the clearer.
Dec
10
comment Automatically Loading .csx in Roslyn
You should be able to just add a .csx file with no /r: prefix to the end of that file and it will be loaded when the Interactive Window is initialized.
Oct
27
comment Does Roslyn contain compiler source code?
It's in the comments at blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/10/19/…. Note that the Eric also mentions that we only use CCI for metadata emit and IL generation.
Oct
25
comment Does Roslyn contain compiler source code?
It's a relatively small portion, used primarily for emit. The bulk of the compiler (e.g. parser, binder, syntax tree API, etc.) are not available.
Oct
21
comment In C# determining if an object o is an Action<…> or Func<…>
I understand where you were coming from on statically bound -- i.e. statically bound to DynamicInvoke. The actually delegate call is definitely not though. The question mentioned performance, which is why I guess I'm belaboring this point. :-) It's all trade off. DynamicInvoke is going to perform better initially, but for several calls, the cached call site for dynamic will perform better. For raw speed its better to just check the type, cast and call. :-)
Oct
21
comment In C# determining if an object o is an Action<…> or Func<…>
A quick Console app test shows that 1,000,000 DynamicInvoke calls on a delegate takes about 4 to 6 times longer than 1,000,000 calls to the same delegate that is first cast to dynamic and invoked normally. DynamicInvoke does all of its reflection magic at runtime, but the compiler emits a call site to speed up the dynamic call.
Oct
21
comment In C# determining if an object o is an Action<…> or Func<…>
DynamicInvoke doesn't do any static analysis either. It's 100% late-bound and takes an object array as a parameter list.
Oct
21
comment In C# determining if an object o is an Action<…> or Func<…>
I'm not sure this would be much faster than dynamic. To be clear, Delegate.DynamicInvoke falls back to reflection to invoke the delegate. I would expect it to be on the same level as dynamic with regard to efficiency. Dynamic might actually be faster with caching.
Oct
21
comment Microsoft Roslyn vs. CodeDom
You'd need to do a rewrite before passing it to the compiler. First, parse code with your special keywords. The code will parse and, unless the parser couldn't make heads or tails of it, the invalid keywords will show up as SkippedTokenTrivia in the resulting tree. Then, detect the skipped keywords and rewrite the tree with valid code (e.g. AOP weaving). Finally, pass the new tree to the compiler. This is definitely a hack though, and it's not guaranteed to work with future versions of Roslyn. E.g. the parser might produce not produce the same tree for broken code in future releases.
Oct
21
comment Microsoft Roslyn vs. CodeDom
Actually, it isn't true that you can use Roslyn to extend C# with additional keywords.
Oct
27
comment how was Array.Sort implemented in .NET?
FYI -- your VB code is invalid syntax. Array initialization is not legal when explicit bounds are specified. Take the '6' out to make it valid.
May
20
comment Are .NET 4.0 Runtime slower than .NET 2.0 Runtime?
FWIW, running an x86 process on a 64-bit machine is not suboptimal. In general, running an x86 process on a 64-bit machine is actually faster than running an x64 process. See my response below for why I believe the benchmark is flawed.
Aug
29
comment Can someone abuse LINQ and solve this money puzzle?
Using LINQ to solve this would hardly be abuse! :-)
Aug
5
comment Integrate Third Party tool with vb.net
We would need more specifics to give you an effective answer.
Jun
25
comment C# Const field in abstract class
Given which answer directed you to the solution, you should have shown quite a bit more code. If we had actually seen your code, it would have been clear.
Jun
16
comment Bit shifting confusion in C#
@scott2012: I can't speak for your hex editor, but that's how BitArray works -- the least-significant bit is at index 0. You can verify this with a short bit of code: var bits = new BitArray(new byte[] { 0xf0 }); // 11110000 for (int idx = 0; idx <= 7; idx++) Console.WriteLine("{0}: {1}", idx, bits[idx]);
Jun
13
comment What is the VS 2008 IDE Written in?
@ojblass -- if you're referring to language skills, C++ and C# are a good place to start. Having the ability to pick up other languages quickly is a plus.
Jun
13
comment What is the VS 2008 IDE Written in?
@ojblass -- VS integration can be created in managed code.
Jun
5
comment Tuples( or arrays ) as Dictionary keys in C#
IComparable doesn't have an effect on how keys are stored or located in a Dictionary<TKey,TValue>. It's all done through GetHashCode() and an IEqualityComparer<T>. Implementing IEquatable<T> will achieve better performance because it alleviates the boxing caused by the default EqualityComparer, which falls back on the Equals(object) function.