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Jan
10
awarded  Yearling
Jun
24
revised Full-text search in CouchDB
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Jan
10
awarded  Yearling
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Jul
9
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
10
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Jun
8
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10
awarded  Yearling
Apr
15
comment Unicode support in C++0x
The standard contains Unicode streams at least in the latest draft. See my edited answer.
Apr
15
revised Unicode support in C++0x
added 584 characters in body
Mar
23
comment Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
Thanks :) It seems that he really meant a tentative definition.
Mar
23
comment Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
@compile-fan If it would be outside then it would be a tentative definition.
Mar
23
comment Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
@compile-fan Declaration in your question does not declare any kind of variable it just declares a field of a structure. Furthermore the structure inside which it's declared doesn't produce a symbol. It's not a tentative definition too.
Mar
23
comment Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
Thanks, the fact that compilers accept such multiple declarations is quite interesting. However struct list_head source_list;'s in module.h are not global variable declarations because they happen inside other structures (namely module_use and module).
Mar
23
comment Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
Ok, so is it a declaration of a global variable?
Mar
23
comment Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
Are you saying that struct list_head source_list; in module.h is a definition of a variable?
Mar
23
revised Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
added 89 characters in body
Mar
23
answered Why can non-extern be in .h files in C/C++?
Mar
13
answered Full-text search in CouchDB
Feb
10
comment Using posix semphores question
@vBx I can' understand how you assign Handle::destinationAddress now. Anyway you probably assign a pointer to some kind of temporary string.