1,380 reputation
21225
bio website deskew.com
location
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visits member for 5 years, 11 months
seen Oct 24 at 20:32

Born at an early age, I am a long time software developer with a Ph.D. in CompSci. When I'm not actively working on our sheet music management application for the iPad, I spend my time touring and performing (keyboards and eigenharp) with a couple of progressive rock bands.

1) The Security Project (http://SecurityProjectBand.com)

2) Beyond The Wall (http://BeyondTheWall.net)


Jul
25
comment How do you turn the infix applicative operator into a prefix function?
The one thing I did NOT try was putting (*) before ($). The key insight you make (obvious once you make it) is that that <*> is operating on EVERYTHING to its left. Many thanks
Jul
25
accepted How do you turn the infix applicative operator into a prefix function?
Jul
24
asked How do you turn the infix applicative operator into a prefix function?
Jul
19
comment Is there a way to use DNSMasq and BIND on the same computer?
Thank you for taking the time to explain, I really appreciate it.
Jul
19
accepted Is there a way to use DNSMasq and BIND on the same computer?
Jul
19
comment Is there a way to use DNSMasq and BIND on the same computer?
So which is better? It seems like it would be easier to assign multiple IP addresses (which I didn't know you could do) than to mess with the ports.
Jul
18
asked Is there a way to use DNSMasq and BIND on the same computer?
Jul
5
accepted One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
Jul
5
comment One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
Thank you everyone who responded. Much to digest --- I wish I could tick ALL the answers as correct since they're all incredibly helpful.
Jul
5
comment One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
Actually the reason I was investigating this stuff was because I was trying to avoid having to pass extra arguments all over the place. I was experimenting with having some global parameters being accessible to lots of functions.
Jul
5
comment One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
@Gabriel --- thanks for answers. Regarding #2, I was actually thinking in terms of having to lift functions, not concerned about the laziness aspect. Rearding #3, by "how" I actually meant implementation. When f calls g (say), how does the "State" part become accessible to g? In other words, is there an equivalent of the hidden "self" or "this" being sent around under the covers? What happens if you have two sets of state?
Jul
5
comment One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
@dfeuer --- the problem is that nothing in those libraries is beginner friendly.
Jul
4
comment One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
Thank you --- three questions. One: can g now call a new function h which also does modifications that propagate back to main? Two: suppose I have a bunch of regular function calls (e.g, add x y = x + y). Can I call those things directly from inside g (or h) and still have the result propagated all the way back? Three: assuming yes to all of these, how exactly is the state being passed to and from those functions and what happens if there are other regular arguments?
Jul
4
asked One more time…can I have an example of state monad that does what I want?
Jul
3
comment Global variables & the reader monad
This doesn't help me. In that example, one could just call the two functions directly with the value from the configuration, there's no need for Reader. What I'm trying to understand is how to do this where one function calls another which calls another and they ALL have access to that "global" configuration.
Jul
3
comment Global variables & the reader monad
I know it's a year later but to me this does not answer the question. The problem is not just that there's compuationUsingArg1Arg2, but that computationUsingArg1Arg2 might want to be able to call OTHER functions that also need access to the "global" information. Otherwise you could just pass the parameters directly and not need the reader. So how are all those other functions defined and invoked?
Jul
2
comment How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
Generally, one would like to have the main code just be a sequence of that one-liner, i.e, define an event kind, associate it with an "object" and then associate the desired code to be triggered when the event occurs. This seems very awkward to do in Haskell
Jul
2
comment How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
The inability to format these comments is extremely frustrating.
Jul
2
comment How can I reduce the number of arguments I have to pass around in Haskell?
Well, although I now understand in principle what's going on, I couldn't get your example working. More importantly, it's not at all clear that the code is simplified by using the ReaderT. The one liner ' onButtonClick xml "button1" [putStrLn "Hello, world"] ' has gotten replaced by stuff that (a) requires much more complexity (b) extra functions (now I need a makeButton1, what about makeButton2, and so forth) and I no longer have an simple sequence of actions. I'm becoming less certain that Haskell is a "better" way to do this kind of thing.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious