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1h
comment Converting measurements in Java
+1 The important lesson here is that if a school assignment is underspecified, feel free to exploit those holes. By doing so you'll learn how to write exact specifications later in your career. :)
1h
comment Converting measurements in Java
If you post code as the answer, what exactly will have OP learnt from this? Wouldn't it have been better to gently steer him/her in the right direction?
2h
comment Should a private static fields be visible from nested class when qualified by the surrounding one?
@miselico Since it's so easy to work around it, I'd expect it to be a pretty long way down the list of bugs to fix. The Eclipse compiler has far bigger problems than this :)
2h
comment Converting measurements in Java
If you need to convert things like 5'7", first you need to read in a String instead of a Double (as 5'7" isn't a valid number), then you need to split it into feet and inches using the String.split() method for example. For weight you can follow a similar pattern.
10h
revised Should a private static fields be visible from nested class when qualified by the surrounding one?
added 94 characters in body
10h
revised Should a private static fields be visible from nested class when qualified by the surrounding one?
added 94 characters in body
10h
answered Should a private static fields be visible from nested class when qualified by the surrounding one?
10h
comment Should a private static fields be visible from nested class when qualified by the surrounding one?
Since the type of v is int, a reference to it is a constant expression and is therefore valid.
10h
comment Should a private static fields be visible from nested class when qualified by the surrounding one?
Since annotation parameters must be compile-time resolvable (in our case, constant expressions), this seems to be a glitch in the compiler.
11h
comment When does PriorityBlockingQueue sort the elements?
If you're putting mutable objects into your queue, you've got problems. If you don't, it shouldn't matter when compareTo() is called.
12h
comment Is there an efficient Java standard API class what have both Stack and Set features?
You definitely need to measure what's causing things to slow down first. It could be that you're simply running out of heap space, it could be GC, it could be an inefficient implementation of the collection (most built-in collection classes weren't designed to work equally well for 10 million entries as they do for 10 thousand). Without pinning down the cause by experiment, how do you expect to find the solution?
14h
comment Wicket invalidateNow() deletes other session cookies
I wouldn't call that behaviour "weird", I'd rather call it "correct". If you're invalidating the session, you want to invalidate all data tied to a session. The question is: what is the problem you're trying to solve?
1d
comment Some questions about java coding style
What you're looking for is called "static method".
1d
comment JVM crashes when attempting to run multiple invocations on a high-memory, many CPU server
And I'd definitely request at least a thread dump when the application crashes, but also possibly a heap dump.
1d
comment JVM crashes when attempting to run multiple invocations on a high-memory, many CPU server
Depending on the setting, Java may use more threads than just the one for GC. That said, having more threads than cores shouldn't be a problem at all, apart from the obvious slowing down. I know this isn't an answer but I'd probably try to run all the parallel tasks in a single JVM.
1d
comment Java generics, Unbound wildcards <?> vs <Object>
@Aetos That assumption is correct.
1d
comment Java generics, Unbound wildcards <?> vs <Object>
That may be worth a mention, given that List<?> is somewhat analogous to List<? extends Object>. So the difference between List<Object> and List<?> is like the difference between List<Number> and List<? extends Number>.
1d
comment Java generics, Unbound wildcards <?> vs <Object>
And how about List<? extends Number>?
1d
comment What is a constant in Java
This is close to the definition of constant expression, but then "foo"+"bar" is also a constant expression, as is 42*Math.PI
1d
comment What is a constant in Java
@DreddTrekkiter I'm afraid this isn't a very useful question. Constant (without a qualifier, like "compile time" or "enum") isn't a rigorously defined Java term. It is generally considered to be a static final field with an immutable or primitive type, but there could be other definitions that are just as valid. At the end of the day it doesn't matter much, what matters is how each of the constructs work.