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17h
comment Why GenericServlet declares service method?
@BalusC I wouldn't have thought this was the real reason either but it's fun to hunt for possible differences. The difference in behaviour when a default method is added is actually quite useful to know, it'd make a good test question for one of those annoying interview tests that don't really test your abilities. :)
1d
comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
@Nexusfactor It depends on so many things. Yes, in general you'd want as many of your classes to be immutable as possible. You can for example create an Employee class that has a Department field, which is then implemented by IT, QA, Accounts and so on. You can now make your Employee class immutable on the condition that the Department implementations are immutable too. There's no way to tell they will be but if you design your classes right, you can minimise the risk.
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comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
@Cruncher Okay, let's put it this way: there is no way to enforce immutability of yet-to-be-written code. There are ways to encourage it, one of them being composition.
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comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
@Cruncher To underline the impossibility of this requirement, consider how there's no automated way to tell whether a class itself is immutable in the first place. How could you enforce something on all implementations of an interface that the compiler can't even test in isolation on a single class?
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comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
@Cruncher In that case, the answer is that it isn't possible in Java. Though I still fail to see a valid reason why anyone would want that.
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comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
@Cruncher You can bullet-proof YOUR code. But you can't bullet-proof other code in advance. There's no way to force immutability on all implementors of an interface, neither is there a real need to do so.
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comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
@Jesper That is true. Just as String is just one implementation of CharSequence, there are others that are mutable.
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comment Immutable Classes and Subclasses
There's nothing wrong with using an interface. Yes, the interface wouldn't guarantee that all the implementations will be immutable but you can guarantee that all the implementations you provide are. Other implementations are not your problem.
1d
comment Best practises for using interfaces in code, but hiding internal methods from end user
Though on second thought that would still allow a malicious client to access the private field beanFactory in ContextImpl via reflection.
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comment Best practises for using interfaces in code, but hiding internal methods from end user
@AdamSkywalker At the end of the day the user can just use reflection to call any method. If you need to completely hide this, you can use composition instead of inheritance. I'll whip up an example of that too .
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answered Best practises for using interfaces in code, but hiding internal methods from end user
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comment Best practises for using interfaces in code, but hiding internal methods from end user
You can have two interfaces, one containing the method getBean(), the other extends it and adds destroyBeans().
1d
comment Java switch over an enum does not detect that all cases are covered
There's no way to enforce at compile time that all cases are covered separately using switch/case. If a value must be returned for all enum constants, you can for example make that value a field of the enum.
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comment Java switch over an enum does not detect that all cases are covered
@immibis Even if it was possible, the compiler shouldn't necessarily bother about it.
1d
comment How is it possible to use the for-each loop for classes that do not implement Iterable
Recall that only classes that implement Iterable can be cycled through by the for. And arrays, let's not forget about arrays.
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revised AtomicReference to array and array element changes visibility
added 876 characters in body
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revised AtomicReference to array and array element changes visibility
added 28 characters in body
1d
answered AtomicReference to array and array element changes visibility
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comment AtomicReference to array and array element changes visibility
On second thought, it is guaranteed that you'll only ever see [first] or [first,second] and nothing else.