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Aug
17
comment Objective C allocating objects on the stack
There are a lot of cases where init may reallocate the underlying memory, and even more ones where it may just free it and return something completely different. And you cannot even rely on testing as this may (and actually did) change depending on the version of the operating system and libraries. It's not just a question of separating them. It's more that init assumes memory that can be freed just as much as release and autorelease do.
Aug
15
comment Objective C allocating objects on the stack
There is a big big problem in your code. The call to [obj init] may try to deallocate the object and return a completely different object.
Jul
12
comment Validate to app store. Invalid Code Signing Entitlements. iCloud
Did you try using XCode 5? Because, you know, XCode 6 is in beta too.
Jul
10
comment Validate to app store. Invalid Code Signing Entitlements. iCloud
I do not think it was a mistake. I think it was intentional. That functionality is in beta. They may need to change the APIs and/or reset/delete anything saved on iCloud with that API at any time. Users should not have an app with that functionality enabled before it's out of beta.
Jul
10
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
As for the documentation I do feel that Apple documentation is often misleading because it tries to cater for people that are not used to the precise abstractions underlying the semantics of whatever the documentation is about. Building intuitive understanding is good, but intuitive understanding is always misleading. It shall be a step stone in the path to a more abstract and correct understanding. People should build on their own intuition, not be given a pre-cooked one. Otherwise they'll be trapped for a long time in the delusion of thinking the intuition is the abstraction, while it's not.
Jul
10
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
@drewag A value type is not mutable. It can have a mutating member exactly because mutating does not mean it mutates the value, it means it mutates a reference to a value of that type. This does not confuses the issue. It makes it clearer. It only seems confusing if you do not understand what value means. Study some abstract mathematics and/or a language like Haskell and it becomes extremely clear.
Jul
10
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
The unwrap operator returns an immutable value because that's the nature of an immutable operation. As Lattner says there's isn't an obvious solution. Making the unwrap operation mutable is not a solution: you would not be able to use it on an immutable Optional and it would not solve the problem because the returned value would still be immutable (as all value types are always immutable).
Jul
10
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
@drewag Value types are immutable. Mutable members do not really mutate a value, they compute a completely new value. That's why they can only be invoked on a var: they silently take a reference to the var so that they can 'assign' the newly computed value to it.
Jun
30
comment Does Swift have a null coalescing operator and if not, what is an example of a custom operator?
@Teejay It is for automatically creating a closure surrounding the argument. And that is exactly how short circuit is implemented in applicative order languages. Instead of passing a value, which in applicative order makes the computation strict, you create a closure which may be lazily evaluated.
Jun
30
comment Does Swift have a null coalescing operator and if not, what is an example of a custom operator?
@Teejay His implementation is strict in both arguments, mine is only strict in the first argument. You would expect this sort of operator to have lazy semantics at least in the second argument (also known as "short circuiting") and not compute the default value at all, if there already is a value. This is what I do, he doesn't.
Jun
29
comment Loss of precision 'sqrt' Haskell
@augustss true. But cyclotomic numbers are also not a general solution. They just happen to be capable of representing the square root of 2, but they still are a subset of the irrationals (reals that are not also rationals). They would have handled the sqrt 2 * sqrt 2 case correctly in the same sense that plain doubles can handle sqrt 4 * sqrt 4: it just happens to be a computation where all intermediate values are finitely representable by the type. Plus I agree with @LaurentGiroud that in a very loose sense cyclotomics are like a symbolic representation of some complex numbers.
Jun
29
comment Loss of precision 'sqrt' Haskell
Not only the result could be anything, but in the specific case of a double precision floating point type the result must not be 2. The result you get is the one you are guaranteed to get by the IEEE 754 standard that defines the floating point type. Any other result would be wrong.
Jun
29
comment Loss of precision 'sqrt' Haskell
A compiler should always and only perform optimizations when the result would not change. sqrt has type Floating a => a -> a, sqrt 2 has type Floating a => a and (*) has type Num a => a -> a -> a therefore sqrt 2 * sqrt 2also has type Floating a => a. This is a polymorphic result. The actual type used is decided when you instantiate it (for example by printing). The compiler has no (and cannot have) knowledge of exactly what code will be executed. And certainly not about what level of precision is required. It cannot optimize it because the result does not have to be 2.
Jun
28
answered Loss of precision 'sqrt' Haskell
Jun
28
revised Is an associative map or dictionary a functor?
retracted, lol
Jun
28
revised Is an associative map or dictionary a functor?
added note about applicative/monad if key is monoid
Jun
28
answered Is an associative map or dictionary a functor?
Jun
26
comment What is the limit (if any) to the tuple cardinality in Swift?
@GabrielePetronella Nope. I replied in more details to your other comment: stackoverflow.com/questions/24429455/…
Jun
26
comment Underlying type for Tuple in Swift
@GabrielePetronella Nope. Optional is a type constructor. Since you know some Haskell, let's talk Haskell. Maybe t is a polymorphic type. Maybe is it's type constructor. Just is (one of) it's value constructor(s). In Haskell a value constructor is also a value level function despite the fact that it's capitalized (any other alphabetical value level identifier starts with a lowercase letter). For tuples things get weirder (in Haskell) because of specialized syntax: (,), as well as (,,) etc., are both type constructors and value constructors, depending on context.
Jun
26
comment Underlying type for Tuple in Swift
"rather you will have several types Tuple2, Tuple3 and so on". More correctly those are not types, they are parametric (polymorphic) type constructors. Array and Optional are other examples of these. They are not types. They are type constructors.