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Jun
26
comment Underlying type for Tuple in Swift
"A tuple type is defined by both the types of the elements it holds and their cardinality". It's not the cardinality of the types (which makes no sense) but the cardinality of the tuple itself. I'd write: "A tuple type is defined by both the types and the number of the elements it holds"
Jun
26
comment What is the limit (if any) to the tuple cardinality in Swift?
Actually it's not true that you have a different type for each cardinality. You have a different type for each ... tuple type. A tuple of two Ints has a different type than a tuple of two Doubles, even if they have the same cardinality. A tuple type is in fact an extension of a product type to higher cardinalities in the same sense that a tuple is an extension of an ordered pair to higher cardinalities.
Jun
26
comment How do I access a class property by string in Swift?
I do not see any downvotes (maybe someone downvoted and someone else upvoted or the downvoter changed his mind). There are two votes for closing as duplicate. I disagree with them because reflection is not the only way to do what you want to do. It would be in Swift, but there are languages that can do it with no need for actual reflection.
Jun
26
comment Swift and mutating struct
@JosephKnight It's not that structs default to immutable. It's that methods of structs default to immutable. Think it of like C++ with the reverse assumption. In C++ methods default to non constant this, you have to explicitly add a const to the method if you want it to have a 'const this' and be allowed on constant instances (normal methods cannot be used if the instance is const). Swift does the same with the opposite default: a method has a 'const this' by default and you mark it otherwise if it has to be forbidden for constant instances.
Jun
26
comment Immutable/Mutable Collections in Swift
@xenadu Source? ETA on that beta?
Jun
14
comment Possible optimizations in Haskell that are not yet implemented in GHC?
@David "everything out of the IO monad could be optimized away with this". Not true. Diverging computations and, in general, codata may not be optimized. In particular anywhere there is recursion (both at the type level or at the value level) there's potential for divergence and for many computations it is hard or impossible to statically prove that they do not diverge. The fact that there is no properly inductive type (all types in Haskell are pointed) complicates things further as inductive reasoning about your program is not possible.
Jun
14
comment What is the automatic memory management mechanism in Swift?
@alcalde sure. Interestingly however the OP wrote that he did look it up in the book and did not spot it. It may be embarrassing for him not to have read the book carefully enough, especially given the extremely simple language (and I mean English) used in the book, but it's hardly less on topic than any explanation of, say, the C++ standard. Besides it certainly is not too broad and there are neither too many possible answers or too long answers. If the flagging system cannot express the reason to close the question either the flagging system need fixing or the reason is not a good reason.
Jun
13
comment Why does filters in Swift iterate the collection twice?
They could. They didn't. It's an implementation choice. Depending on other implementation details it may or may not be the best choice.
Jun
7
answered Weird optional value usage in swift
Jun
7
comment bridging swift & objective-c protocols?
Agree with @StephanePhilipakis. The whole point of Swift is to make absolutely sure at compile time that there are no errors in your code. And int is not guaranteed to be the same as an NSInteger and if you mixed them in your C or Objective C code, that is an error. An error that the compiler does not catch. Your code may or may not work. It may work now, and stop working when the user upgrades to the next version of the OS. With C and ObjectiveC you will only see the error when it happens at runtime (maybe in the future). With Swift you see it when you compile the code today.
Jun
7
comment How to call Objective C code from Swift
@DavidMulder: yes. And that's why I did not flag the question. I just thought RTFM in my mind.
Jun
7
comment How to call Objective C code from Swift
@EvolGate: exactly what is missing from Objective C that prevents it from being a platform independent language? The language and the language standard libraries are open source. You can use Objective C in and for Windows, Os X, Linux, BSD, Solaris and any other platform supported by either GCC or LLVM. You can easily port Objective C to any platform with a decent C compiler even if it's supported by neither GCC nor LLVM. I do not see how it could be more platform independent than this.
Jun
7
comment How to call Objective C code from Swift
Interesting that this question gets so many upvotes and a bounty. When I first saw it I just thought: RTFM. As posed it really show no research as currently there are only two or three resources that officially document Swift, and one of them is fully dedicated to exactly this (and is linked to in the first comment).
Jun
7
comment Overloading “.” produces errors
In fact . is not even an operator at all.
Jun
7
comment Why is using a generic Int that switches between 32 and 64 bits better than explicitly using Int32 and Int64
@user2864740 Swift is not formally specified, so there is no minimum guaranteed. But most probably, if it had to be formally specified, it'll make the same choice most modern languages with similar characteristics made: a guaranteed minimum of 31 bits.
Jun
7
comment Why do I need to specify what type a variable is in a class in Swift?
Swift is both type safe and strongly typed. JavaScript is type safe but not strongly typed. Apple's book is not formal, it's colloquial. And it's colloquial intentionally because if it was formal most of the intended audience would not be able to understand it. In the specific paragraph that is quoted they could have been formal and still understandable, but they chose to be informal overall.
Jun
7
comment Why do I need to specify what type a variable is in a class in Swift?
@Andraw There's no default value. You must write an init and initialize the variable there if you do not provide an initializer. The only exception is for optionals (which do not need initialization because ... they are optional).
Jun
7
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
Note in particular that, for Arrays, mutation of the array means mutation of the length but not mutation of the content. And in fact this is why the append call failed in the OP: it is a mutating method of the array. It needs to create a new array and assign it to a variable, but it can only do it if it has a variable, and there was no variable containing the array.
Jun
7
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
It is not unclear. It just does not mean what you think it means. It means that you can call mutating methods of that value. And what mutating methods do is they take a hidden argument that is the address of the variable, create A NEW value, and assign it to the variable. They do not mutate the actual original value (unless the compiler can prove that there was no aliasing or sharing, in which case it can perform optimizations and actually mutate the original storage, but this happens transparently).
Jun
7
comment Implicitly unwrapped optional made immutable
It's the variable that is mutable, not the value. The value, for value types, is always immutable. The documentation sometimes speaks in a non formal way, other times is more formal. When it says that a string or an array is mutable when assigned to a var and immutable when assigned to a let it's just saying that the value itself is immutable, but you can assign it to a mutable var and mutate the var. That is why you cannot call a mutating method of anything that is just the argument of the constructor of another type.