Reputation
4,070
Top tag
Next privilege 5,000 Rep.
Approve tag wiki edits
Badges
8 17
Newest
 Caucus
Impact
~265k people reached

Jun
6
answered Does Swift have a null coalescing operator and if not, what is an example of a custom operator?
Jun
6
answered Read-only and non-computed variable properties in Swift
Jun
6
comment How to write a function that takes a function f and a float x and applies f to x k times using Swift?
lol, I'm too much used to Haskell. I had forgotten the '(' and ')' in the call to f :P
Jun
6
revised How to write a function that takes a function f and a float x and applies f to x k times using Swift?
added 1 character in body
Jun
6
comment How to write a function that takes a function f and a float x and applies f to x k times using Swift?
Yup. Too bad I hit post before finishing writing, lol
Jun
6
comment How to write a function that takes a function f and a float x and applies f to x k times using Swift?
Yes, sorry. I had hit post too early, I was not finished writing. I have corrected that and completed the answer with the unrolled version. Tell me if there still is something wrong: I do not have the Swift compiler here, so I'm going by heart.
Jun
6
revised How to write a function that takes a function f and a float x and applies f to x k times using Swift?
added 447 characters in body
Jun
6
answered How to write a function that takes a function f and a float x and applies f to x k times using Swift?
Jun
5
awarded  Custodian
Jun
5
reviewed Leave Closed C# Variance Issue with IEnumerable<T> vs <T>
Jun
5
reviewed Reopen How can I have a link open in a frame?
Jun
5
comment What is the purpose of willSet and didSet in Swift?
Oh, ok. But the important point is that a computed property does NOT have an underlying storage. See also my other answer: stackoverflow.com/a/24052566/574590
Jun
5
answered Encapsulating property transformation/validation
Jun
5
answered Why is it slow to update a class property compared to a local on in Swift?
Jun
5
comment Computed read-only property vs function in Swift
You can do it already (the difference is that the stored property you use for support will be public). But the OP asked if there is a difference between declaring a read only property or a function in the base. If you declare a read only property, you can then make it read-write in a derived class. An extension that adds willSet and didSet to the base class, without knowing anything of future derived classes, can detect changes in the overridden property. But you cannot do anything like that with functions, I think.
Jun
5
comment Computed read-only property vs function in Swift
You can add a setter or define a stored property when the base class defined the name as a function? Surely you can do it if it defined a property (that's exactly my point), but I do not think you can do it if it defined a function.
Jun
5
comment Swift native base class or NSObject
The fact that this is how it's done now does not mean that it is how it'll be done tomorrow. As you say notifications, property observers, delegates and similar are or may be provided natively. The language will evolve, and we do not know in which direction. It has gained a lot in terms of support for functional programming. But it does it in an unusual way, so I have no idea how much is missing. Yet as far as we know they may be heading toward discouraging mutation and encouraging pure functional programming. What if the future of the UI is reactive? No way to know yet.
Jun
5
comment Swift native base class or NSObject
The way the language is designed, it is optional opt-in. As far as we know it may very well be that in the future system APIs will be added that are not natively objc. In the mid/long term they may even migrate existing libraries to non-objc code with a thin compatibility layer in objc that calls into the non objc code. We just do not know. We'll probably be able to make educated guesses in a few years from now. But for the moment it's just a big question mark.
Jun
5
comment How does Swift store arrays of structs?
The arrays are dynamic therefore, in general, storage for the array content must be allocated on the heap. It's reasonable to assume it's contiguous storage (for O(1) access). Beyond that you do not know and should not know. Small arrays may be handled differently than large ones. What really happens may depend on how many arrays are sharing the data. Optimizations may allocate stuff on the stack, or even in registers. The heap may be managed differently than it is in C (that is it may be a separate heap not managed with malloc). What happens may change when you upgrade the OS.
Jun
5
answered Swift native base class or NSObject