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  • 0 posts edited
  • 0 helpful flags
  • 254 votes cast
Mar
30
accepted Why is a point-to-volatile pointer, like “volatile int * p”, useful?
Mar
30
comment Why is a point-to-volatile pointer, like “volatile int * p”, useful?
@templatetypedef-I think I got your idea. Thanks a lot!
Mar
30
comment Why is a point-to-volatile pointer, like “volatile int * p”, useful?
@templatetypedef I am still confused. Say you have the code "int *p = &x; a = *p; do_something_else; b = *p;" I cannot imagine "b" would be assigned using a value that has been read for "a = *p", because that would be so wrong if the value of x has been changed somehow. My point is that even there is no volatile, I should expect "b = *P" will lead to a real read using the address of x rather than an old value stored in a register.
Mar
29
comment Why is a point-to-volatile pointer, like “volatile int * p”, useful?
Thanks. So it has no difference whether there is "volatile" for my example, right? But if there is another statemenet "int b = *p" following, it does make a difference, right? Specifically, "b" may be initialized using a register storeing "*p" instead of doing a real memory reference.
Mar
29
asked Why is a point-to-volatile pointer, like “volatile int * p”, useful?
Mar
13
asked Hook statically linked “malloc” function family
Mar
11
comment What does this type cast mean?
Good point. Thanks. BTW, I hate such windows-specific type definitions as PVOID and DWORD.
Mar
11
comment What does this type cast mean?
It is c++, thanks.
Mar
11
comment What does this type cast mean?
So, the effects of the two type-casts are the same, right? Which is more widely used?
Mar
11
accepted What does this type cast mean?
Mar
11
comment What does this type cast mean?
Thanks! But how comes this doesn't work: foo(&(PVOID)pFun);
Mar
11
asked What does this type cast mean?
Mar
3
comment How to invoke a system call via sysenter in inline assembly (x86/amd64 linux)?
Thanks! It seems that it very unlikely for even weird programmer to directly code using sysenter to invoke a system calls. We are actually working on a binary (including malware) analyzer for listing all the system calls in a target program. That is why we want to collect all the ways a system call is issued. It seems that we can ignore this direct sysenter approach.
Mar
3
accepted How to invoke a system call via sysenter in inline assembly (x86/amd64 linux)?
Feb
29
asked How to invoke a system call via sysenter in inline assembly (x86/amd64 linux)?
Feb
17
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
15
comment Why int80h instead of sysenter is used to invoke system calls?
Later I found that in native environment glibc in Ubuntu 8.04 "calls *%gs:10h", which then calls sysenter (of course, the processor is not an ancient one, so it supports sysenter). So it turned out that the VMware affected the installation of ubuntu and that glibc used int 80h for system calls.
Feb
11
comment Why int80h instead of sysenter is used to invoke system calls?
Glibc in my system uses int 80h directly, ignoring the vsyscall page. Actually your answer without the new "Edit" is more reasonable. Thanks anyway.
Feb
11
accepted Why int80h instead of sysenter is used to invoke system calls?
Feb
5
comment Why int80h instead of sysenter is used to invoke system calls?
But as Peter pointed out, the kernel has settled down the compatibility issue using vsyscall, no matter the processor has sysenter instruction or not, then why doesn't glibc configured in Ubuntu simply make use of vsyscall?