471 reputation
211
bio website execdesign.blogspot.com
location Seattle, WA, United States
age 57
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 14 hours ago

I'm a husband, father, and software developer, designer, and architect, in roughly that order. I've been an engineer, and I'm working to add engineering rigor to the software development process.

I've been delivering software professionally since 1980.


Sep
2
comment Proper way to call a GUI in Java
In @pzaenger's response, "Main" is the controller, and "GUI" is the view. Swing confuses the issue a bit, because most swing components serve both the view and the controller role in the MVC pattern. I often use the pattern he's describing, though--adding a separate model class which maintains app-wide preferences and view state (e.g. screen position and window size). Be clear with yourself on GUI's role: is it view and controller, or just view? In this model, it's just view. Same with anything you embed in GUI.
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
5
comment java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
Additional data: java.lang.Socket's InputStream doesn't always obey the read(...) contract; I have observed a state change in some sockets wherein, after several message exchanges on the socket, read returns with 0 bytes read, when 4 are requested, instead of blocking as documented.
Jun
5
revised java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
added 2 characters in body
Jun
5
comment java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
Wish I had found the problem. Still a complete mystery. BYTES_PER_INTEGER comes from the protocol definition, not the Java definition. It's very convenient that they're both "4". :)
Jun
4
comment java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
Good points; thanks Hector. I need the socket.available() condition--not all received messages increment nResponses, and I want to flush the socket. The decoded message's messageId has to match the supplied messageId. Messages which don't match can be unrequested notifications. The timeout always occurs while waiting on the length bytes, and I never get a partial read on those if the first one arrives.
Jun
4
comment java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
One more detail that might or might not be relevant: if I run the client on my Mac to a server running on an EC2 instance (Amazon Web Services (AWS)), it works 100% of the time without inserting delays. If I run the client on an EC2 instance on the same subnet as the server, the delay is required.
Jun
4
comment java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
as requested. :) I should've done that anyway. I removed a lot of logging, to make things more readable in this format.
Jun
4
revised java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
added 3248 characters in body
Jun
4
revised java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
added 3248 characters in body
Jun
4
comment java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
That is undoubtedly true. Something I'm setting, or not setting, or doing to the socket is undoubtedly the problem. I simply have no clue what it might be. It's remarkable that simply adding a Thread.sleep(125) makes the problem go away, though.
Jun
4
asked java.net.Socket blocks to timeout if you read too soon after write
Mar
17
comment Beginning Testing in Java with JUnit
we name our test types differently (*Test, *IntegrationTest) and keep them in the same directory tree. Performance tests have their own project. This is largely up to the build script designer, though, and depends in part on how your tests are run and who runs them..
Mar
17
answered Beginning Testing in Java with JUnit
Mar
17
comment Which is the best way to avoid SocketTimeoutException?
digging deeper: why are you adding the "0" element at the end of resultList? I don't see any obvious way to close your sockets using the tool you are using (Jsoup), but I'm not familiar with the library. Finally: as Hanno said, by itself, a timeout exception isn't a big deal--but you need to understand why it's happening, and handle cases where it's unexpected. Try catching the exception and writing out what URL you were calling when it happened.
Mar
17
answered Which is the best way to avoid SocketTimeoutException?
Mar
17
comment “Give a rough estimate of the overhead incurred by each system call.” - what?
Overhead in this context is "the amount of time spent in the system call, unrelated to doing the task at hand", which in your case appears to be "writing a string to stdout".
Mar
5
comment should I use PrintWriter to wrap BufferedWriter?
If you need the output to appear on the final output stream exactly when you write it, don't use a BufferedWriter. The BufferedWriter can hold the output as long as it likes in its buffer before flushing said output to the final destination. So in this context, "prompt output" means "output which appears at the final destination as quickly as possible" instead of "output which appears at the final destination whenever the buffered writer feels like writing it out."
Mar
5
comment should I use PrintWriter to wrap BufferedWriter?
Yes--all those extra methods are there to make it easy to write various things to the stream. With most writers, you have to generate the right byte sequence yourself. PrintWriter makes a lot of that easier.
Mar
4
comment How to draw a point on a border of a rectangle?
To determine the quadrant, he first needs the angle between the center of the rectangle and any corner--thus, atan(height/width). This will give the half-angle (center-to-green, if green is on a corner). Then atan(mouse.y/mouse.x) will provide the angle of the line from the rectangle center to the mouse cursor (because in his code, the mouse is located relative to the center of the rectangle). Finally, there are 4 variations of your solution, one for each quadrant.