15,858 reputation
11836
bio website bentilly.blogspot.com
location Santa Ana, CA
age 45
visits member for 3 years, 11 months
seen 12 hours ago

I'm tilly on Perlmonks, btilly on Hacker News, and am active in many forums. I know Perl and math pretty well, but dabble in lots of things.


2d
answered Improving the algorithm for removal of element
Dec
24
comment Finding best neighbour pixel
You should view the calculation as happening over boundaries between pixels, not pixels. Then there is no problem. So going clockwise you'll find that green-blue leads to blue-red leads to red-blue leads to blue-brown and there is no problem.
Dec
24
answered Encoding system sorted by the number of 1
Dec
19
comment How to find the amount of each review based on the average and total number of reviews
Why on Earth do you need to generate this much fake review data? Are you trying to post realistic fake reviews to some unsuspecting website or something?
Dec
19
answered Redis: Efficient key sharding for large key set
Dec
15
comment Creating a Maximal Configuration with Dynamic Programming
You are right that there is a dynamic programming solution. It starts by sorting the tuples from strongest to weakest. Now as you build stacks, you will always be putting the current tuple on top of the stack. You never need to keep stacks that have another one which is at least as tall and has a breaking point at least as low.
Dec
13
answered Generate a list of permutations paired with their number of inversions
Dec
11
comment Exclusion principle implementation
This shouldn't be closed as too broad since there is a specific question here. Namely, "How do I use Inclusion-Exclusion to count only sequences with all colors?" And the answer is, "The sum over subsets S of the color of (-1)**(size(S)) * count(rising sequences without anything in S)." Might be better on a math forum though since most programmers don't understand inclusion-exclusion.
Dec
11
comment Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
@MooingDuck The problem is that jobs can have multiple dependencies, and multiple things can depend on them. F(i, j) as described attributes all of the possible additional profit from scheduling children earlier to the decision about when the parent job should run, and then schedules from the top on down. But if the child job depends on independent parents, when the one parent is scheduled affects what F(i,j) should be for the other one and vice versa. So the whole thing falls apart.
Dec
10
answered Codility Rectangle Intersect Challenge
Dec
10
comment Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
@mhum Looking more carefully, you're right. That said, the construction I have is a series of binary choices with clauses that are ands. I still would be willing to bet money that it is NP-hard, even if it isn't the problem I thought it was.
Dec
9
revised Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
Had dependency order backwards for J1..J4
Dec
9
comment Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
@cc2 I updated the post to illustrate how I am reducing a specific type of scheduling problem that you would want to solve to a specific class of MAX-SAT problems. And clarified what more work would need to be done for this to turn into a demonstration that I am correct in suspecting that your problem is NP-Hard.
Dec
9
revised Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
Clarified how the full problem can model some of MAX-SAT.
Dec
9
comment Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
you've modeled enough of MAX-SAT to make answering your question for this type of job actually NP-Hard, but it really has that feel. I'd suggest asking about this variation on csexchange where you'll get people more qualified than myself to analyze the question.
Dec
9
comment Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
@cc2 I have been thinking about the case where P=4, there is a set S of jobs that can happen on either second 2 or second 3, there are other jobs T that get a significant profit if they happen on second 2 and a subset of S depends on them, and still more T' that get a significant profit if they happen on second 3 and depend on a subset of S. For each element of S you have the boolean "this job happens on second 2." Each element of T and T' represents a boolean clause. And you've modeled a MAX-SAT problem. I don't know how to prove that...
Dec
8
comment Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies
That's a major twist and a bad assumption on my part. Sorry.
Dec
8
comment 3n+1 Programming Challenge in Python
@ScottHunter I find it easier to initially implement memoization with recursion. But I agree that rewriting that version iteratively would be likely to improve performance.
Dec
7
comment 3n+1 Programming Challenge in Python
Disagreed on 1. With this problem, recursion is an opportunity to use memoization, which can provide a significant speedup when you avoid redoing work. So it is possible for recursion to improve efficiency, particularly if you're doing a wide range. That said, rewriting a recursive version to an iterative form will probably be a speedup.
Dec
7
answered Maximize profit in scheduling unit tasks with dependencies