4,459 reputation
2438
bio website jonaskoelker.ignorelist.com
location Århus, Denmark
age 30
visits member for 5 years, 2 months
seen 17 hours ago
Cryptography PhD student, gamer ((st|w)arcraft + zelda + guitar hero == happy), musician (guitar|sax|piano|clarinet).

Mar
23
comment Merging two partial (jointly overdetermined) sets of ordering information
I'd be very interested in both a fix of my proof and a faster algorithm :)
Mar
23
comment Merging two partial (jointly overdetermined) sets of ordering information
Regarding the interleaving proof: assume we have b₂, aᵢ, ..., aⱼ, b₁ as part of the solution with b₁ inverted relative to b₂. Let Inv(1) be the number of inversions between b₁ and aᵢ..aⱼ, and Inv(2) likewise. If Inv(1) ≤ Inv(2) then aᵢ, ..., aⱼ, b₁, b₂ has fewer inversions than the original(new Inv(2) = old Inv(1) ≤ old Inv(2), and we fixed the b₁/b₂ inversion), and similarly in reverse if Inv(2) ≤ Inv(1). Since swapping adjacent out-of-order b-elements lowers the inversion count, the solution has the elements of b in order. QED. Correct?
Mar
22
comment Merging two partial (jointly overdetermined) sets of ordering information
Both user_columns and server_columns are arrays, and the server can change the order of columns, i.e. if A and B both occur in server_columns in two consecutive page loads, they can occur in two different orders. The more interesting property, I think, is that user_columns and server_columns can disagree in a single page load, but in either case I think the answer is "yes" :)
Mar
21
comment Merging two partial (jointly overdetermined) sets of ordering information
@Ivarpoiss: javascript
Mar
21
comment Merging two partial (jointly overdetermined) sets of ordering information
This sounds like a reasonable definition. I suspect that the Schulze Method or Ranked Pairs can achieve this, but I haven't though enough about it.
Mar
21
comment How to merge a collection of ordered preferences
This relates somewhat to a question of my own: stackoverflow.com/questions/22570638/…
Mar
21
comment Sequence merging between two semi-synchronized lists
My question may be related: stackoverflow.com/questions/22570638/…
Mar
21
comment Merging two partial (jointly overdetermined) sets of ordering information
Possibly related: stackoverflow.com/questions/15932601/… and stackoverflow.com/questions/6352212/…
Mar
10
comment Large Switch statements: Bad OOP?
@CamJackson: I think I agree---in that case, the only branching that will happen is due to the fact that what is stored in your 100-element array will be put into the program counter (in java this happens indirectly and behind the scenes). Here, I define branching to mean that after the program counter assumes one particular value, it can assume multiple different next values (under normal program execution, no cosmic rays). (Total nitpicking: if your commands were named 0..17 and 19..100, you could have an 101-element array A where A[18] is an error handler. You can generalize further.)
Mar
7
comment Large Switch statements: Bad OOP?
@CamJackson: Sure, if you use a map you can use it with code that doesn't do any branching itself---it has outsourced the branching to whatever map_lookup function it calls (which will branch). I'm not sure what that observation buys you. "It's not really a branch if it happens elsewhere"? The association between input and output is done at compile time for switch (and other control flow) statements, and at run-time for data structures (most likely). It's not like the shape of the switch changes at run-time. Both kinds of look-up require (and one is) a branch. I hope that helps :-)
Feb
17
comment Creating a singleton in python
@dividebyzero: the is operator tests for pointer equality. I would be rather surprised---to the point of calling it a bug---if pickle.loads returned a reference to a pre-existing object rather than a reference to a newly created one. Thus, testing whether s is s1 doesn't tell you anything about the suitability of using modules as singletons.
Feb
3
comment How to determine if a regex is orthogonal to another regex?
Pattern matching with back references is NP-complete---so sayeth en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression#cite_ref-Aho90_24-0, referencing Theorem 6.2 of {Aho, Alfred V. (1990). "Algorithms for finding patterns in strings". In van Leeuwen, Jan. Handbook of Theoretical Computer Science, volume A: Algorithms and Complexity. The MIT Press. pp. 255–300}.
Nov
11
comment Putting a simple if-then statement on one line
Another way: {N: 0}.get(count, N+1). A third way, if N+1 is some expensive function: {N: 0}.get(count, "anything truthy") and f(N). This requires you to know the truthiness of the values of the dict, and they need to all have the same truthiness. If the values are all truthy, invert the boolean operator, e.g. {0: 7}.get(weekday, False) or f(weekday)
Nov
11
comment Does Python have a ternary conditional operator?
@LyndsySimon: uhm... sure it can? Compare if <C1> then <V1> else if <C2> then <V2> else <V3> and <V1> if <C1> else <V2> if <C2> else <V3>: in both cases you could replace <V3> with a third conditional expression without inserting parentheses. The main difference between the Python and the Haskell (et al.) version is the relative order of <Ci> and <Vi>, and the keywording (or not) of then. What other differences do you see? What's worse about one kind of nesting vs. another, beyond the condition/value order?
Nov
11
comment Does Python have a ternary conditional operator?
Why not bool(cond) instead of cond is True? The former checks the truthiness of cond, the latter checks for pointer-equality with the True object. As highlighted by @AndrewCecil, "blob" is truthy but it is not True.
Oct
26
comment How to log a python MemoryError (when I'm out of memory)
I don't think it's that unusual: client data sets of different sizes reside externally; pulling some but not others into memory may prove impossible. Since the data sets of different clients are isolated, logging and then continuing with the next client's data set makes perfect sense to me. Also, it's a daemon program I'm talking about, and I don't want to have a guy sit there and rerun it all day.
Oct
8
comment Linking g++ with opengl (glm, glew and freeglut)
Do you get the exact same compiler error if you add int main(){} after your four lines of #includes? If so, there's an sscce(.org) for you :-)
Sep
21
comment IntegrityError duplicate key value violates unique constraint - django/postgres
An aside: By De Morgan's laws, your condition key[0] != '_' or key != 'csrfmiddlewaretoken' is equivalent to not (key[0] == '_' and key == 'csrfmiddlewaretoken'). It should be easy to see that the inner condition is never satisfied, so it's equivalent to not (False), or in other words True. But then why bother with the if?
Sep
18
comment Large Switch statements: Bad OOP?
"a map [can be O(1)]" -- if the lookup reads k bits, it can distinguish between 2**k different keys. Thus, for n keys, you need to read at least log(n) bits. How can you do that in O(1) time when log(n) is unbounded? In which model?
Sep
17
comment Is there a limit to the length of a GET request?
The link is superseded by w3.org/2001/tag/doc/whenToUseGet-20030922#ephemeral (which says the same thing)