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Aug
1
comment Byte Array and Int conversion in Java
@mr5 The 0xFF is to remove the topmost bits from the converted byte. If the byte has a MSB bit set to 1 then sign extension will translate the resulting int in a negative value as well. So all the higher bits of the integer are set to 1. However, if you shift these 24 (3 times 8) bits into the bit bucket right after that then that doesn't matter much.
Aug
1
answered Can anyone tell what I did the mistake in image encryption and decryption process using RSA
Aug
1
comment Thales Connect HSM - DeriveKey operation
Always include a runtime environment in the tags! Your question will be more visible and the automated syntax highlighting can do its work. This is pretty vendor specific, so it may be tricky to get an answer here. Did you contact Thales?
Aug
1
revised Thales Connect HSM - DeriveKey operation
formatting, tags
Aug
1
comment Linux crypto framework and hardware accelerators
Eh, sorry, no, that was just about the generic properties about the crypto instructions. I don't see any text about integration of them into the kernel crypto.
Jul
31
comment Understanding java ByteBuffer
And I've added some abuse at the end of my answer in response to that :)
Jul
31
revised Understanding java ByteBuffer
added 280 characters in body
Jul
31
revised Understanding java ByteBuffer
added 464 characters in body
Jul
31
comment Understanding java ByteBuffer
Integrated this into the answer, and gave an example that completely rewrote the writeBuffer method without streams. It gives a clue how you can use buffers without requiring a buffer of the same size as the string. It doesn't require streams although an alternative would be using an InputStreamReader instead of the CharBuffer and ByteBuffer.
Jul
31
revised Understanding java ByteBuffer
added 1926 characters in body
Jul
31
comment Understanding java ByteBuffer
You should never ignore the return value of in.read(byte[]). You may not retrieve all the bytes you are asking for. The byte array buffer given may not be completely filled (as you may reach end of stream before that, or the stream may have other reasons to give a partial message in response).
Jul
31
revised Understanding java ByteBuffer
added 393 characters in body
Jul
31
comment Understanding java ByteBuffer
No, it doesn't. It only fills the backing array, but the ByteBuffer instance doesn't (cannot) get notified of this. In other words, the contents of the ByteBuffer are changed, but neither of the offsets including the position and limit is. This is the same as byte[] tmp = bytes.array() followed by in.read(tmp).
Jul
31
answered Understanding java ByteBuffer
Jul
31
comment Java Card - static source code analysis tool
Yes, I agree that such a list would be helpful. But I'm not sure that such a list could or should be created on SO as an answer to a question - I don't think that anybody has an answer in place so it would come down to doing research. Besides that, I could post an empty list - would you accept that as an answer? What if somebody comes along with one or two (new) alternatives? Edit my accepted answer? Post a new answer, rinse & repeat? So although I agree that such a list would be useful, I'm not sure if asking for one here is all that practical.
Jul
31
revised FlushFinalBlock closing application
added 54 characters in body
Jul
31
comment FlushFinalBlock closing application
Ah, also see that you're new here; welcome to StackOverflow (SO)! Pretty tricky first question you got there. Hint, you can use backticks around inline code fragments.
Jul
31
comment Java Card - static source code analysis tool
@IraBaxter I somewhat agree, especially if it is just about the existence of tools. The answer however is very much linked with the time of asking, and it is very questionable if an answer would be better than for instance a Google search. That said, the fact that the answering format of SO is very flexible does make this site a great candidate to answer just this kind of thing. All in all, you can question the SO policy on meta. Using the current rules this question however is off topic.
Jul
31
comment Linux crypto framework and hardware accelerators
As for the benefits, they are usually two fold: 1 faster / less CPU intensive operation and 2 (often forgotten) less susceptible to side channel attacks - if implemented well of course.
Jul
31
comment Linux crypto framework and hardware accelerators
Good question - but not really a programming question. From where I stand, the crypto framework in the crypto kernel isn't really there to support user level implementations at all. It's there because lower level kernel protocols (such as IPSec mentioned in the documentation) require kernel level encryption. Note that there are different forms of CPU level crypto: those that require drivers (VIA padlock, to my understanding) and those that are directly available as general purpose instructions (Intel AES-NI, also in AMD processors).