123 reputation
7
bio website
location
age
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen Jun 6 at 14:33

May
17
comment Is there a production ready lock-free queue or hash implementation in C++
I came here to say just that.
May
10
comment What can I use to profile C++ code in Linux?
(See my previous comment.) For those who are not versed with gdb, all you have to do is "gdb -batch -x commands ./executable pid" where commands contains something like (in my case) "info threads" on the first line, "bt" on the second line for back trace, and "q" on the last line for quit, which may not even be necessary. I just run a big job, logged into one of the nodes on a distributed machine, and run that simple script. I have noticed that the problem was caused by my custom runtime making assumptions that did not work well with my application code. Rest was a one-line fix and victory! :)
May
10
awarded  Commentator
May
10
comment What can I use to profile C++ code in Linux?
How can I thank you for this brilliant reply? I have been banging my head on the wall for weeks trying to find the problem with a complex setup (mpi->a custom runtime->threading, etc.). I have just written a simple script to call gdb repeatedly on one of the nodes (does not matter which one in my case), show threads, and at random dump back trace for one of the threads. Calling this script repeatedly I was finally able to see where the problem was! I got a magnitude of improvement, and it turns out that the problem was fundamental but also extremely easy to fix. I love you Mike Dunlavey! :)
Dec
17
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
I have received a word from some compiler writers that your analysis is indeed correct and that the Commeau compiler does the right thing.
Dec
17
accepted Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
Dec
15
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
BTW, I have not marked either of your answers as an accepted answer yet because the different compilers give at least 3 different answers (see the comments on @JesseGood's answer). I am especially troubled by the change of the behavior between EDG frontends. The new frontend either does the right thing, or it introduces a bug comparing to what the old frontend did in the Commeau compiler. Perhaps there is still some other part of the standard that we are all missing. Or the EDG people got it wrong. Hopefully we can gat this cleared up.
Dec
15
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
So which frontend do we trust now? :) I am inclined to go with the newest version of EDG since they always are quite pedantic on standard compliance, but I don't see where in the standard does it say that they do the right thing. For Clang, this discussion seems to be related. If this has not changed until now, Clang seems to be ill-equipped to deal with this issue.
Dec
14
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
That is because, according to EDG group's page, MSVC uses the EDG frontend for intellisense but not for the actual compilation. Also it seems that MSVC must be using a different version of EDG frontend than the newest Intel compiler.
Dec
14
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
Perhaps you are correct. Maybe the only reason for block-scope declarations is compatibility with C. I would really like to know if this was the only motivation behind this feature, and if it would be desirable to remove it were it not for compatibility.
Dec
14
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
That's strange. I tried the Intel compiler, which also uses the EDG frontend, and I got no errors at all. I am utterly confused now. BTW, downloading the Intel compiler is a pain.
Dec
14
awarded  Scholar
Dec
14
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
The linkage does not need to be from the same file. It's similar to using directives. You can put one outside a block scope, but if you only need it for one block scope, you can just put it directly in there. If you use a qualified name, you are selecting only one function, but with block-scope declarations you can select more and perform overload resolution on this selection. Again, I have not actually seen much of such uses, but these uses are the only ones I could come up with.
Dec
14
comment Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
I did not know much about block-scope declarations either until I started looking into this problem. It seems that one can use them to avoid pollution of global namespace, to turn off ADL, and to explicitly select which functions should be called at a given block. Otherwise, block-scope declarations seem to act the same as non-block-scope ones. Of course, block-scope-definitions are not allowed. I would not advocate block-scope declarations, but those are the possible scenarios that I could come up with and that do not seem achievable using other means.
Dec
14
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
13
awarded  Editor
Dec
13
revised Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
Figured out part of the question, but there is more. Also grammar.
Dec
13
awarded  Student
Dec
13
asked Rules for lookup of operators in C++11
Dec
13
awarded  Supporter