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Jul
31
awarded  Popular Question
Jul
23
comment How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
It's probably relevant to note, that the flexibility present in the conflict detection, change tracking, and the other features that seem to make this an implementation burden, are intended to support a consumer-naive data layer by implementing many of the most commonly-used features of data consumers. So, what I meant above is that this means, I suppose, that disabling these features could be considered a design flaw, by creating a very strong dependency in your data layer on the non-concurrent operation of the modules above it. Always tradeoffs, right?
Jul
22
comment How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
But, generally speaking, "DataContext is ideally suited for a 'unit of work' approach". blogs.msdn.com/b/dinesh.kulkarni/archive/2008/04/27/… Avoiding creating discrete work units is dumping a lot of the features of it, and really limiting the flexibility of your data layer. Since you are concerned about design "correctness", you may wish to concede the effort to manage units of work. This also aligns you with transaction rollbacks, etc.
Jul
22
comment How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
Other options: Note that your reference to an answer stating you shouldn't hold a connection assumes concurrency. If you don't wish to manage a unit of work because it is all one unit, then you are already making that concession. So the 'badness' arising from holding a single context is mostly not present. You could, just to err on the side of caution, dump the context each SaveChanges. You could detach the objects and reattach them safely, since there can be no externally-driven conflicts in your non-concurrent application operations. You could manage your own cached elements.
Jul
19
comment How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
LOL, were there three (3) paragraphs when my last paragraph was of most interest to you? :)
Jul
19
revised How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
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Jul
19
revised How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
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Jul
19
answered How do I maintain referential transparency between related entities without relying on a common data context instance?
Jul
18
comment Login(over https) via some pop-up, while browsing site & being on same page(over http)
The SSL stripping attack reference is exactly the sort of real-time attack that I was referring to.
Jul
18
comment Login(over https) via some pop-up, while browsing site & being on same page(over http)
And by "false sense of security", you are referring to what exactly, when there is no indication given that the password is protected at all, since, per the question, HTTPS is not used? There is no UI indication that encryption is used.
Jul
18
comment Login(over https) via some pop-up, while browsing site & being on same page(over http)
the goal I was referring to was not to secure a potion of the site, the goal I was referring to was to prevent transmission of the clear password. It's one thing to review a capture of data and collect passwords for everyone having visited your site. It's another to actively compromise all of the sessions in real time.
Jul
18
comment Login(over https) via some pop-up, while browsing site & being on same page(over http)
Your claim that cleartext is no greater risk than a man-in-the-middle attack is false.
Jul
18
comment Login(over https) via some pop-up, while browsing site & being on same page(over http)
This is kind of a ridiculous answer. Why wouldn't you want to secure the user's password, even if the site content was publicly exposed? Many people use the same password for multiple sites, and some of them may carry data with greater need for privacy.
Jul
18
comment Implementing location.hash bound bidirectionally to AJAX record-context
+1 for the recommendation to use newer technology, but note the problem is still the same, since in the fallback case it uses the technology referenced in the original question. It's one thing to "downgrade" non-essential features in older browsers, but to determine they cannot click detail links at all is a no-go for me.
Jul
18
accepted Implementing location.hash bound bidirectionally to AJAX record-context
Jul
18
revised Do while loop in SQL Server 2008
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Jul
16
revised Implementing location.hash bound bidirectionally to AJAX record-context
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Jul
15
comment Implementing location.hash bound bidirectionally to AJAX record-context
But maybe I don't understand what you are suggesting?
Jul
15
comment Implementing location.hash bound bidirectionally to AJAX record-context
"On 26 February 2013, Internet Explorer 10 was made available for download to all Windows 7 SP1 users." - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internet_Explorer_10 So, especially in light of how badly Windows 8 sucks (and is avoided), I think disabling core functionality on IE9 is a bad choice.
Jul
15
comment Implementing location.hash bound bidirectionally to AJAX record-context
The problem is exactly the same, yes? How does a client that doesn't support History (including IE9) respond to selection of a record?