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  • 5 votes cast
Jun
11
comment Query: getting the last record for each member
This is great. Totally satisfy my need/curiousity (a Sequel way to query) and a bonus SQL statement.
Jun
11
accepted Query: getting the last record for each member
Jan
11
awarded  Supporter
Jan
7
comment Query: getting the last record for each member
Thank you very much. Your approach is certainly in the right direction. I will give it a try and see if I could get the result that I need, and provide a Ruby Sequel statement in return, if possible.
Jan
7
comment Query: getting the last record for each member
Thank you for answering; however, your answer didn't satisfy my need. I want a way that could give me only 1 (latest, by checking the end date) record for every single member (001, 002, 003) in the table .
Jan
4
revised Query: getting the last record for each member
added 137 characters in body
Jan
4
revised Query: getting the last record for each member
added 137 characters in body
Jan
4
asked Query: getting the last record for each member
Sep
28
comment Ruby variable scopes
In other words, there are 2 local variables. "short_name" on the left is a local variable. "short_name" on the right is another local variable (should be different memory allocation, right?), and not the instance method "short_name" (since "short_name" is already in scope.) Thank you @ChrisRice
Sep
28
accepted Ruby variable scopes
Sep
28
comment Ruby variable scopes
Chris, would you please put it as an answer instead of a comment so others could vote on it. Also, if you could provide a reference/link to prove your conclusion is not coming from your own observation then it would be great.
Sep
27
comment Ruby variable scopes
Nonetheless, I like this answer because self.short_name.downcase gives a hint of avoiding ambiguous. But it fails on answering WHY my code was ambiguous.
Sep
27
comment Ruby variable scopes
It was intended not to have short_name= being defined, so the short_name = in the greeting_line should be a local variable--as intended.
Sep
27
revised Ruby variable scopes
added 246 characters in body
Sep
27
comment Ruby variable scopes
My previous comment doesn't make sense either. What happen if I have n = 0; n = n + 1. The n on the right side is obviously NOT looking at the n on the left side.
Sep
27
comment Ruby variable scopes
However, one of the reason I wrote it that way was to leave the instance variable unchange. If I use @short_name = .... this will change it.
Sep
27
comment Ruby variable scopes
Thank you. I guess Ruby is always parsing the left side of the "=" first. And this cause the "short_name" on the right side point the the local variable "short_name" instead of the instance method "short_name"?
Sep
27
awarded  Commentator
Sep
27
awarded  Scholar
Sep
27
comment Ruby variable scopes
the "short_name" (on the left side) in the "greeting_line" is intended to be a local variable. The "short_name.downcase" (on the right side) in intended to be the value.