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Jan
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Jan
13
comment Memory alignment : how to use alignof / alignas?
@Serthy To clarify alignof is a compile-time constant. alignas is not, and will have to be supported by your implementation of new (requirement of the standard), or by a custom std allocator.
Jan
13
comment How do I determine the size of my array in C?
@unwind Thanks, I stand corrected. To correct my comment, sizeof will always be constant in C++ and C89. With C99's variable length arrays, it may be evaluated at runtime.
Jan
10
comment Can a heap-allocated object be const in C++?
Clever interpretation of the question, though slight bug in the code, it should be int& not int*.
Jan
10
comment Understand math done for endpoint in canvas arc
You're confusing the rounding modes (which is literally which rounding operations can be done on a floating point) with the parsing of floats from a string. Fixed-point uses a single integer, with a fixed precision, N bits integer, M bits fractional part. It is not necessarily the most efficient way to handle fractions on any system. It all depends on the scenario. In some cases it can really save performance to not have to convert floats into integers (possibly need for indexing purposes), and fixed-point can help. But if there's a dedicated floating point processor, that's usually faster.
Jan
10
comment Understand math done for endpoint in canvas arc
So basically you repeated exactly what I said. The truncation happens as a result from following the IEEE 754 standard, not from ECMAScript itself. It's nitpicking, but true. In response to "if you are using fixed float", I said fixed-point math, that means you're using an integer format to represent decimal numbers, using a precision you control. You don't have to write assembly to write optimized code.
Jan
10
comment Understand math done for endpoint in canvas arc
I could -1 for "Because it is easier for the computer to handle radians than degress", or for the stating that "Javascript will just round back to the 15 decimal places". For the first, if your architecture doesn't support floating points, or if you need to do some low-level optimization and use fixed-point math, degrees may actually be much faster to compute with. For the second, Javascript (or ECMAScript) doesn't round to 15 decimal places, instead it uses the precision of the underlying format (a 64-bit IEEE 754 floating point), which has variable precision. However, I'm going to be petty.
Jan
10
comment Understand math done for endpoint in canvas arc
@Blindman67 He clearly states that he understands what the math for startAngle does, and with that he implied to understand radians. He asked why they picked 2.4, the answer is because that's the angle that points to the bottom left, simple as that. He didn't ask for a lecture about radians.
Jan
10
revised Can I set a parameter using ngRoute?
Paste code into answer for quick reference.
Jan
10
revised Can I set a parameter using ngRoute?
Paste code into answer for quick reference.
Jan
10
revised Can I set a parameter using ngRoute?
Explain how to solve his particular parsing problem.
Jan
10
revised Can I set a parameter using ngRoute?
added 185 characters in body
Jan
10
answered Can I set a parameter using ngRoute?
Jan
10
answered Understand math done for endpoint in canvas arc
Jan
8
answered How do I determine the size of my array in C?
Jan
8
comment How do I determine the size of my array in C?
@M.M Another small nitpick: Depending on your system architecture, the address space is not nearly as large as the pointer size on most systems. Windows for example limits address space for 64-bit applications to 8TB or 44 bits. So even if you have an array larger than half of your address space 4.1TB for example, it'll not be a bug. Only if your address space exceeds 63-bits on those systems, it's possible to even encounter such bug. In general, don't worry about it.
Jan
5
comment difference between #if defined(WIN32) and #ifdef(WIN32)
@jpinto3912 But that gets even hairier with ||
Jan
4
comment C++ constructor order
@JitendraMahari No, what I say is that if you have class N : public M { type fX, fY; N(type fy, type fx) : fY(fy), fX(fx), M(fx, fy) { }; that it's going to execute in the order : M(fx, fy), fX(fx), fY(fy). Because it first constructs the base class, then the fields in the order in which they are defined in the class body. The constructor list's (I prefer that over the term initializer list, due to C++11s initializer lists) order doesn't matter at all. The order is regardless of what you type in the initializer list.