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May
4
comment Why is quicksort better than mergesort?
@CristianCiupitu I'm aware that Quicksort utilizes the cache, what I'm disagreeing with is your assertion that merge sort doesn't. Merge sort will generally keep both arrays in the cache, and it pretty much exclusively accesses data sequentially, which is the best-case for the cache. Quicksort has an edge over merge sort because of many factors, such as not requiring a secondary array, double pivot scenarios. But cache locality is a strong point for both algorithms.
Apr
28
comment Direct casting vs 'as' operator?
As a general rule of thumb. Usage of as must be followed by a test to see if it is null. Or at least other code that accepts null as a valid input. That said, I use as casting quite frequently, an example where I'd use it is for a method that accepts IEnumerable<T> but can preallocate a dynamically sized collection if it's also an ICollection. ICollection col = input as ICollection; if (col != null) something.Reserve(col.Count);
Apr
24
comment Why is quicksort better than mergesort?
@CristianCiupitu Shouldn't that be the other way around? Merge sort accesses data sequentially, causing (both target and destination) cache lines to stay in memory. Quicksort can on the other hand be all over the place. Not to say that mergesort is better, but I don't think this is one of its downsides.
Apr
19
comment Why can't I preallocate a hashset<T>
It is worth mentioning that this relies on a .NET implementation detail, and may break in any version, or even within the same version due to patches.
Apr
19
comment How is GetHashCode() implemented for Int32?
@JeffWalkerCodeRanger That is generally true. But most hash tables are implemented by doing hashCode % bucketLength. Therefore the common sequence of 0, 1, 2, 3, ... will have perfect hash codes. However, if your input is 0, 32, 64, 96, 128, ... any power-of-two bucket size array <= 32 will have 100% hash collisions. If MS would change it to do some bit shuffling, there'll be another sequence that'll give 100% hash collisions. My point is, there is no context for Int32, and without context, you cannot make a good hash function. If you need to hash data, write your own hasher.
Apr
19
comment Best practices: throwing exceptions from properties
These are guidlines, and like most guidelines, it is sometimes better to break them than to enforce them. For example the .NET Nullable<T>.Value's getter throws when no value is assigned. It could have been done using a GetValue() method, but using a property, at least to me, seems nicer.
Apr
19
comment What is the default behavior of Equals Method?
@WillYu Not bitwise equality. It tests if the characters are the same. Bitwise equality would mean that all .NET metadata (such as whether the string is interned or not) would be the same. It's also not special (in this regard), it just overrides Equals, and overloads the (in)equality operator. The default implementation for it would still be reference equality.
Apr
15
comment Static linking vs dynamic linking
Seems fine, but CPU speed has definitely not reached its limits.
Apr
15
comment Unknown file type MIME?
@Svish Long story short. application/octet-stream is for application specific data, not for when you don't know what the data represents. Omitting the MIME type tells the target to find out how to parse it itself. All with all, if you don't know it, and don't want to make an effort to get to know it, just don't send MIME types. It's all about communication and interfacing, not about 'the browser can figure it out'. Yes it can, but it shouldn't have to unless you tell it to.
Apr
15
comment Unknown file type MIME?
@Svish If you have no idea as to what data you're sending (arbitrary third party data) then you should omit the MIME type. If you know for example that the data you're sending is an image, you can test if it is one of the popular image formats and send that MIME type. If it's a less common image type like say a HDR exr file, most media you're going to interface with isn't going to be able to handle it anyways.
Apr
12
comment What is the best way to debug OpenGL?
It's been open sourced and renamed to GLSL Debugger, link: github.com/GLSL-Debugger/GLSL-Debugger
Apr
5
comment Wait for resources to complete
Glad I could help. Please consider accepting it as answer.
Apr
5
answered Wait for resources to complete
Mar
24
awarded  Notable Question
Mar
14
answered C# generic type constraint for everything nullable
Mar
13
comment Why would you use Expression<Func<T>> rather than Func<T>?
Nice list, one small note is you mention that the inverse conversion is possible, however an exact inverse is not. Some metadata is lost during the conversion process. However you could decompile it to an Expression tree that produces the same result when compiled again.
Mar
13
revised Invoke multiple Expressions with .NET 3.5
Add an alternative solution that may help future visitors.
Mar
11
comment Is floating point math broken?
@ArneBabenhauserheide I think it's worth adding that this will only work with rational numbers. So if you're doing some math with irrational numbers like pi, you'd have to store it as a multiple of pi. Of course, any calculating involving pi cannot be represented as an exact decimal number.
Mar
11
comment Can a local variable's memory be accessed outside its scope?
I'm just going to write a program now that keeps on running this program so that 4) I win the lottery
Mar
3
comment Invoke multiple Expressions with .NET 3.5
@usr I am well aware, although inlining happens at JIT level, so it shouldn't matter much whether or not it is called directly from C# or from inside of the compiled function. But as I mentioned performance was a secondary concern, my primary motivation was getting rid of the ugly hack while preserving behavior. :) The actual performance loss will probably come from the InvokeAll call altogether. It calls a variable number of functions through a delegate. Hard to unroll, possibly hard to inline.