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Jan
4
comment C++: When to use References vs. Pointers
@paercebal You're completely ignoring my point. AT THE CALL SITE, a pass by reference has the SAME SYNTAX as in C++, and does not require any syntactic notation. In C++ AT THE CALL SITE, you ALSO need special syntax to pass to a what in C# would be ref parameter. When dealing with reference types. The only time it differs is when passing a value type by reference. You stated two things "if you are passing an object reference by ref, the info means nothing much", and "ref and out is syntactic". Both are completely wrong. I'm just hoping you don't misinform people who read this.
Jan
3
comment Unknown file type MIME?
@jenson-button-event It has nothing to do with reinventing the wheel. The MIME type specifies your intent. If you know that what you're sending is supposed to be a png image, pass that information along. If the bytes accidentally represent a jpeg, your application can warn you that it's not a valid png, and that you have a bug somewhere else. In addition, not all applications are as robust and fault-tolerant as a browser. They're designed to fix the programmer's mistakes, but that is nowhere near it's only purpose. A browser's not the only application using MIME types.
Jan
3
comment C++: When to use References vs. Pointers
@paercebal They actually are really different from C++ references. A value type parameter without ref would be similar to MyClass in C++. A reference type parameter without ref would be similar to MyClass&, a value type parameter with ref also maps to MyClass&. A reference type parameter with ref maps most closely to MyClass*&. Of course there are nuances. Most importantly however, is that in most cases when dealing with classes you'll be passing by reference, without marking it as ref. Similar to how references are passed in C++.
Jan
3
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
...or more precisely, it contains a back-pointer to the object owning Tree, which can be different types (either another Entry or the 'root'). Point remains, an Entry knows how to remove itself. However, I don't think I can implement it without violating the first 'rule' of the project. I don't know if I can use an unimplemented functor as template argument for a unique_ptr. But that's definitely worth a try. I'll hopefully get around to testing that tomorrow. --- Thanks a lot for the effort put into answering my question, I'm going to test all approaches you've shown me!
Jan
3
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
However, the way you use it is exactly the idea I have. I have a CreateEntry and DestroyEntry method. Though the destruction is deferred/queued to allow other Entry's that also reference this Entry to properly clean up before the memory is released. Several events are also fired on the Entry itself during this cleanup. That's why I omitted it from my example code, since it'd complicate the example. --- The unique_entry_ptr is a nice concept, though I don't know if I can use it. The deleter would require access to the EntryImpl which does contain a back-pointer to the Tree...
Jan
3
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
The example using polymorphism is indeed the classic solution, by returning an interface. The upside of this approach is a downside for my scenario. With an interface anybody can implement the interface, and the client may be under the impression that his class that is conforming to the interface is actually a valid parameter. I do not see the advantage of using non_owning_pointer<T> since that's exactly what I'm using T& for. Being a reference it both indicates that the value cannot be nullptr and that it doesn't own memory, it just references it.
Jan
3
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
But EntryImpl contains more information. The relationship between Tree and Entry is indeed one of ownership. The tree instantiates, owns and destroys an Entry when requested by the user. This takes care of several other systems (events, caching, spatial indexing, etc.) which are handled 'under the hood'. The client should never have to worry about how the library does it, and the library should be able to freely change how it does it (better algorithms or other optimizations) without impacting the client's code. The EntryImpl* const m_Impl; pointer is an opaque pointer.
Jan
3
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
Questions regarding software design are generally soft questions, I don't know if the code review site would really be appropriate as well, since I'm not posting actual code, rather a simplified example of the situation. --- Either way, thanks for the response. A few things I omitted in the sample, but are checked for in code. 1. The constructor throws an exception when passed a nullptr. 2. The assignment and copy constructor are actually deleted. --- The Entry class and EntryImpl indeed have a 1 on 1 relationship. Entry exposes some of the functionality of EntryImpl to the client.
Jan
3
accepted Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
Jan
2
comment C++: When to use References vs. Pointers
@paercebal What you state about ref and out is incorrect, they are most definitely not syntactic sugar. Parameters are passed differently. A reference parameter to a reference type is still a different behavior than a value parameter to a reference type. You can change what the reference refers to. As for it being syntactic sugar when passing it as an argument, that's also incorrect. On both IL and machine code level it's a different call. When reflecting, it's actually a different type (though ref and out are the same type), and therefore you can even overload methods on it.
Jan
1
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
@dyp I've rewritten the question, hoping to clear up all questions you have/had regarding it. And a happy new year :).
Jan
1
revised Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
Rewrote the question, hoping to clear up the intent and to shorten it.
Dec
30
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
Yes, the library both needs to track the memory (to properly clean it up afterwards), and hold a list/other data structure to iterate over it. In the sample I'm just storing it in an std::vector but in the real scenario the underlying storage adapts to the stored content (when the data set becomes larger it'll switch over to more efficiently modifiable collections). --- The user can request (deferred) deletion, and it can also change what EntryManager it belongs to, but all of that is done by moving the std::unique_ptr<Entry> not by reallocating/copying/moving the actual Entry.
Dec
30
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
I was talking about Entry::m_Impl too. I marked the pointer as const because I don't intend to change it after the Entry is created. I could change the storage of the implementation class (change Entry::m_Impl) by marking it non-const, but in my use case that would make no sense. They're not autonomous entities, and it wouldn't make sense to move or copy the memory. Basically, they're an entry point for users to hook in their own customization code, but the users cannot take ownership of these Entry classes.
Dec
29
comment Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
Thanks for your response. EntryImpl isn't const, the pointer is. Meaning the underlying implementation storage cannot be changed after instantiation. Currently none of the classes are copyable or movable. They'll only be exposed to the consumer of the library as references. --- I'm mostly working under the restrictions that no implementation details may surface to the consumer of the library. In addition, all memory is managed by the library, and all data given to the client is in form of handles, not actual objects.
Dec
29
revised Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
corrected spelling, hopefully improved formatting
Dec
29
asked Designing the instantiation and destruction of a class using the pimpl idiom
Dec
28
answered css: start to fill repeat-y from bottom
Dec
25
comment How expensive is RTTI?
@mcoder That's why the article explicitly states that the latter necessarily involves traversing an inheritance tree plus comparisons. @CoryB You can "afford" to do it when you don't need to support casting from the entire inheritance tree. For example if you want to find all items of type X in a collection, but not those that derive from X, then what you should use is the former. If you need to also find all derived instances, you'll have to use the latter.
Dec
25
awarded  Pundit