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8h
comment How expensive is RTTI?
@mcoder That's why the article explicitly states that the latter necessarily involves traversing an inheritance tree plus comparisons. @CoryB You can "afford" to do it when you don't need to support casting from the entire inheritance tree. For example if you want to find all items of type X in a collection, but not those that derive from X, then what you should use is the former. If you need to also find all derived instances, you'll have to use the latter.
9h
awarded  Pundit
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Question
Dec
17
comment How to call a function from a route in AngularJS
Like I stated on the other answer way over a year ago, I wasn't looking for calling some global function. I ended up going for the approach that the directive and service I'm using for the menu binds a handler to the button. So I no longer use a route for it.
Dec
1
comment base.Method() with multiple levels of inheritance not being called?
Pretty old question I know, but I just wanted to add that this is obviously a nice pattern if that's what you want. If you need the client to be able to disable base class functionality (and actually override it), this is not the way to go. Of course, then you'd be calling base.MethodOne() in the first place.
Nov
24
comment How does delete[] know it's an array?
@Sam While it may work in some environments, it's an implementation detail, and it shouldn't be relied on. I doubt the actual array length will be stored anyways, it's most likely the size of memory block allocated to support the array.
Nov
12
comment Floating point division vs floating point multiplication
Just in case people are wondering about this, I know VC++ allows you to configure if you want the compiler to make these optimizations. I'm assuming most modern C++ compilers give you similar options. See the MSDN page on the /fp flag.
Oct
27
comment How do I extend a host object (e.g. Error) in TypeScript
Is there any reason you'd want to omit it though? I personally like the style "SpecificException: ExceptionMessage" format it provides.
Oct
18
comment uint vs int in C#
@MarkH Completely agreed, but when doing a reverse iteration it can be useful in the form of: for (int i = arr.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--) { }. Doing that with a uint will result in an overflow exception or worse, an infinite loop.
Sep
30
awarded  Explainer
Sep
30
awarded  Notable Question
Sep
22
comment Logical xor operator in c++?
@einpoklum Pure speculation, but I'd bet on no. Even if the compiled could ensure that the bool values are indeed a 0 or 1 (or whatever the system uses), which should be possible because of the first '!', they'd still have to have a specific optimization for an (in)equality between two of those boolean values. Seems too much trouble for an arguably insignificant and easily manually code able optimization.
Aug
19
awarded  Necromancer
Aug
12
comment Recommend sorted collection to search closest value left and right
@CaptainComic Ancient comment, but wrong. You can do a binary search on any sorted list resulting in O(log n) lookup time. Usually even faster than a tree due to the memory layout (more chance of having the entire list available in the cache memory). The thing that's significantly slower in a list is modification. If you have to insert an item halfway to keep it sorted you'll have to move all items behind it, resulting in an O(n) insertion most of the time. If the item should be inserted at the end it's O(log n), unless it has to resize the internal array in which case it's O(n) again.
Aug
10
comment Modules in C++11
@Alice The point I just made clear is that even a public change does not force recompilation in any way. Currently it does, because of the way includes and preprocessor directives work. If a public change isn't of importance to the other file, it doesn't have to be recompiled.
Aug
10
comment Modules in C++11
@Alice So changing a method from void SomeClass::X() { this->y--; } to void SomeClass::X() { this->y++; } is a public change? If you have 2 classes defined in module/file A, X and Y and module/file B includes A. You make a change to class X, but module B only uses class Y. The compiler can simply keep track which parts are actually used, and based on that recompile Module B. With modules it's possible to do this kind of tracking, and I don't doubt most compilers will implement optimizations like those. You should do some investigation before you just say "It's impossible because it's C++".
Aug
10
comment Modules in C++11
@Alice Modules do solve this problem, because every module is only compiled once. The Clang docs explain it in more depth than a comment can (or should). The header/source model is what causes C++ to be so terribly slow at compiling. Even if all private changes required a full clean rebuild, modules would be faster than an incremental build with the header/source model. Either way, modules will also greatly improve incremental building times (assuming no optimizations), because if the public interface doesn't change no other code is affected.
Jul
31
comment How to deploy private apps to Windows Phone?
@robwirving The post did mention that, but I read it was $99 a year. I found that the costs for an individual account is now $19 but couldn't find whether these costs are recurring. Are those fees annual?
Jul
31
comment How to deploy private apps to Windows Phone?
2 apps sadly doesn't seem like enough for me, I'm quite surprised that Microsoft tries so hard to promote their platform while this essential piece of freedom isn't that free. Thank you for the answer.
Jul
31
accepted How to deploy private apps to Windows Phone?