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seen Mar 3 '13 at 9:27

Feb
1
comment RESTful API, where to place the Authorization key
Take a look at Designing a Beautiful REST+JSON API talk by Les Hazlewood (here are the slides). Les Hazlewood as a Stormpath CTO and Apache Shiro PMC Chair knows a thing or two about security. Very nice talk.
Feb
1
comment Distributing and using API-keys for web-applications
@juanpaco Thanks for bringing this old answer to my attention. I have updated it with more info.
Feb
1
comment Distributing and using API-keys for web-applications
@matt74tm See the updated answer.
Jan
31
comment Securing / Protecting a Website Administration area
What do you mean by CSS, JS and HTML files being accessed directly? Those files will always be visible to your users and there is no way around it. If the browser can understand it then the user can understand it too.
Jan
31
comment how/why does npm recommend not running as root?
@thejh My advises don't help you if the software itself is malicious as intended by its author. But it helps in a much more probable situation where the software is fine but you are indeed not talking to the author but to someone who wants to serve you a trojaned version of that software. If you get the official version from GitHub then it is in my opinion much less likely that it is malicious. But of course being or not being root is pretty much irrelevant anyway since your private files in $HOME are usually the most important as I said, plus there is sudo as you said. 100% agree on that.
Jan
31
comment which side should I validate the form data, client side or server side?
@Judking You may find Rhino to be easier to integrate with Spring since it is also a server-side JavaScript engine like Node.js but it is itself written in Java. See Rhino in Spring and How to run JavaScript from Java and google for: java spring rhino
Jan
30
comment Advice needed for protecting pc against lan computers
The question was closed so I can't post an answer. Always assume that people can see everything you do on the network - and you cannot detect that they do it. Never use any website where you log in using HTTP instead of HTTPS even if you log in using HTTPS and then get redirected to an HTTP page - see Fireship plugin! Use HTTPS Everywhere and always keep your system up to date. Remember that people can easily see the traffic on the LAN so every sensitive information must always be encrypted.
Mar
17
comment Display “Enable JavaScript” message only when JavaScript is disabled
@Hussein: There is no need to be rude. First you say that @SLaks shouldn't recommend noscript because he has 123k reputation. Now you accuse me of "not getting" what you said above while in fact you didn't say anything to support your irrational fear of the noscript tag. These are not reasonable arguments. Just because there are other ways to emulate the behavior of some tag doesn't mean that it shouldn't be used. Judging from the votes on the answers the majority of people seem to agree. So does the W3C's HTML Working Group
Mar
17
comment Display “Enable JavaScript” message only when JavaScript is disabled
@Hussein: How exactly did the introduction of IE5 make this tag redundant? It is exactly as useful now as it was back then. It is even standardized in HTML5 so it is as modern as it gets. This is also the cleanest solution to the posted question and that is why I upvoted the answer by @SLaks.
Mar
17
comment Display “Enable JavaScript” message only when JavaScript is disabled
@Hussein: Why do you want to avoid noscript so much? It's a standard tag that was invented exactly for cases like this.
Mar
17
comment Display “Enable JavaScript” message only when JavaScript is disabled
You have just reinvented <noscript>
Mar
17
comment Is it ok to let user customise css and Javascript
@Blender: ActiveX.
Mar
17
comment How can you prevent arbitrary client apps from using your anonymous web API?
What do you mean how would they know? Don't they know everything? I mean, we're talking about Google here.
Mar
17
comment How can you prevent arbitrary client apps from using your anonymous web API?
+1 for typing faster than me...
Mar
16
comment Share session (asp->asp.net) security
The paper is somewhat cookie-centric but those ideas are applicable for every client-side session data that you want to be temper-proof.
Mar
16
comment Share session (asp->asp.net) security
That means that it's possible for someone on the client side to modify the data they post back to your page - unless you're using secure cookies.
Mar
16
comment Encrypting powershell passwords
OK. I would actually suggest using solutions from both of our answers together, ie. provide separate credentials for every user and store them in a way that only allows a specific user to decrypt using their user key. I think your solution is good for user passwords. I was only worried about storing the main database password that way but I might have been not clear enough. I just want to make it clear that your ideas for storing user credentials are very good.
Mar
15
comment Encrypting powershell passwords
The original question was asking about encrypting the main database password as a way to make it safe from the users of the script, which is inherently impossible. OK, let's say that you encrypt the database password with the strongest algorithm on Earth. Your script decrypts the database password using a secret key - "4#&7yaoff" in your example. What do you do with the key? How do you store it securely so the user of your script can't see it but your script can use it?
Mar
15
comment Encrypting powershell passwords
You could use PGP, you could use AES, you could use any symmetric or asymmetric, block or stream cipher. But eventually you would have to give your application the key to decrypt your data, wouldn't you? The strength of the algorithm is irrelevant if you give the user your key in the first place. You could use a Base64 encoding just as well because it gives you no security whatsoever.
Mar
15
comment Encrypting powershell passwords
If you distribute the encrypted version of $connString with your application then you have to also distribute the encryption key ("4#&7yaoff") which can be used by anyone to decrypt the $connString. You have basically traded a problem of hiding the database password for a problem of hiding the encryption password. And you can't just encrypt that password with another password, with turtles all the way down.