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 Yearling
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  • 68 votes cast
Feb
2
awarded  Yearling
Feb
2
comment How to write to the Output window in Visual Studio?
Quite simple. It writes to the console window but not the Debug Output Window like the OP wants. I'm using Visual Studio 2013 Premium.
Jan
4
comment How to write to the Output window in Visual Studio?
This would be the optimal answer. Unfortunately it doesn't work.
Oct
22
comment Why can't dead code detection be fully solved by a compiler?
@alephzero and en_Knight - You are both wrong. isPrime is a great example. You made an assumption that the function is checking for a Prime Number. Maybe that number was a serial number and it does a database lookup to see if the user is an Amazon Prime member? The reason it is a great example is because the only way to know if the condition is constant or not is to actually execute the isPrime function. So now that would require the Compiler to also be an interpreter. But that still wouldn't solve those cases where the data is volatile.
Mar
6
comment Does the C standard guarantee buffers are not touched past their null terminator?
As I said, it doesn't matter what the standard says because relying on implementation and non-obvious behavior (which this certainly is) is a really bad programming practice. As for my reference, just read 7.21.7.2 regarding fgets. While the spec can be interpreted to imply that fgets just fills in the buffer with the number of read bytes, it doesn't explicitly prohibit fgets from storing data in the unused parts of the buffer. Thus, OPEN TO INTERPRETATION.
Mar
5
comment Does the C standard guarantee buffers are not touched past their null terminator?
@Segmented:The accepted answer is wrong even though it relies on the standard. Some compiler writers do modify the buffer in order to perform diagnostics such as detecting memory leaks. Even though the accepted answer took a quote from the standard, the quote leaves room for interpretation. Thus, even if fgets/sscanf don't change the buffer, you aren't guaranteed they won't. Regardless of what I just said and even if every compiler writer interpreted the standard in the exact same way, nobody should be relying on such an obscure nuance if the intent is to write robust and maintainable code.
Feb
28
comment Does the C standard guarantee buffers are not touched past their null terminator?
I'll also point out that I have made quite a good reputation for myself and probably owe a couple promotions to being assigned to "tiger teams" and fixing problems created by clever people relying on obscure behavior similar to things like this.
Feb
28
comment Does the C standard guarantee buffers are not touched past their null terminator?
@R - As I said. I would write a function that works regardless of what the compiler writer or library implementer chose to do. I wouldn't rely on a specific implementation or obscure behavior that isn't even reasonable to expect.
Feb
25
comment Does the C standard guarantee buffers are not touched past their null terminator?
A better question would be "Why does it matter?". You shouldn't be relying on behind the scenes and unspecified behavior. If the behavior is needed then an explicit function that is clearly intended to function that way should be created/used.
Feb
16
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
11
comment Memory Leak Detectors Working Principle
@amit:Re:"won't be easy". Depends on what your end goal is, but if your goal is to create a leak detector because your development environment doesn't already have one and you just need it for debug testing then it is just a bit harder than trivial. Just create your own malloc/free implementation and have it spit out any memory still allocated when the program exits. If you are intending to use it in your end product then it becomes a bit harder to ensure it is performant and reliable.
Feb
2
awarded  Yearling
Sep
3
comment The name “XYZ” does not exist in the namespace “clr-namespace:ABC”
I exited Visual Studio, deleted the .suo files (per another user's suggestion) and restarted visual studio and that resolved this issue. I'm not sure if restarting or deleting the .suo files was the solution but it is simple enough to do both.
Aug
5
comment Removing read only attribute on a directory using C#
And what do you do when the directory is read only so you can't add/delete files from the directory? That's what the OP asked.
Jun
26
comment Should I call Close() or Dispose() for stream objects?
I wasn't specifically criticizing your example. I really liked your answer, it was informative. I actually think Microsoft wrote it this way to avoid confusion, so I agree they won't change it. However, I was more intending to make a general comment that relying on a current 3rd party implementation is a dangerous practice. It can change at any time and finding the cause could be really, really hard.
Jun
25
comment Should I call Close() or Dispose() for stream objects?
While I appreciate the details of the answer, I really don't like relying on implementation details of 3rd party functionality for making a decision on the "proper" way to do things. If Microsoft decides to change the implementation so it does matter whether you call Close or Dispose (and in the right order) then whose fault is it when your application breaks because you are relying on implementation details and not documentation details?
May
29
comment Check if display is turned off by windows power management
It also doesn't work if your application's window isn't the active window.
Apr
12
awarded  Popular Question
Apr
2
comment How to properly use TcpClient ReadTimeout
...Another alternative would have been to simply not ask the question at all. But I thought this would be helpful to others.
Apr
2
comment How to properly use TcpClient ReadTimeout
The title is the question. I could certainly have asked the question and answered in a separate response, but I did it this way instead. This was the original question I was going to ask but before pressing the Post button I thought I should do enough research so I could ask a more "informed" question. However, I didn't realize how much time that little endeavor would end up taking. In the process, I answered my own question. Since it took so long to come up with an acceptable solution, I thought it would be nice to save others from having to repeat all the hours of research that I had to do.