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Apr
29
comment Object Oriented Javascript
Matthew, I think you're being a little nit-picky. That wasn't the main point of my answer.
Apr
29
comment What is the most difficult /challenging regular expression you have ever written?
For the whole world to see: pastebin.com/f488b0246
Apr
29
comment What is the most difficult /challenging regular expression you have ever written?
I think I got the algorithm from this book, if you want to try to implement it yourself: tinyurl.com/sipser-computation-theory
Apr
29
revised What is the most difficult /challenging regular expression you have ever written?
cleaned up code a little
Apr
29
comment What is the most difficult /challenging regular expression you have ever written?
It's 345 lines. I could put it up somewhere, but I'm not sure how worthwhile that would be, since it's not that long.
Apr
29
answered What is the most difficult /challenging regular expression you have ever written?
Apr
29
answered Object Oriented Javascript
Apr
29
comment Obtain Date from an RSS Feed in Ruby
Thanks sporkmonger! I will certainly take a look.
Apr
22
comment in Emacs, edit multiple lines at once
I haven't tested this out, but nice work. I was more interested in the "add the same text to the same column" approach, but I'm sure this would come in handy as well.
Apr
22
comment Any good reason for Ruby to have == AND eql? ? (similarly with to_a and to_ary)
I can tell you actually thought about this answer. Among the ones that have been posted so far, this one most directly answers the question "why the distinction", which is what I was looking for. The others are more oriented toward "what's the difference". I also like how you point out this is a general language design question. Indeed, there is more than meets the eye when it comes to equality!
Apr
22
comment Any good reason for Ruby to have == AND eql? ? (similarly with to_a and to_ary)
Thanks for the link. That explains some of the reasoning, although I'm still not convinced. Also, I think you meant "makes sense to Ruby". To me, it makes very little sense that 17.to_s works but 17.to_str does not.
Apr
22
accepted Any good reason for Ruby to have == AND eql? ? (similarly with to_a and to_ary)
Apr
21
comment python, “a in b” keyword, how about multiple a's?
My answer mentions that these objects have to be sets.
Apr
20
comment Good reasons to prohibit inheritance in Java?
Is there a way for me to mark this as the "accepted answer" ;)
Apr
20
asked Any good reason for Ruby to have == AND eql? ? (similarly with to_a and to_ary)
Apr
20
accepted make an object behave like an Array for parallel assignment in ruby
Apr
20
comment make an object behave like an Array for parallel assignment in ruby
This is somewhat helpful, but I hate it when I ask a question and people believe I have no good reason to do what I'm trying to do. If you think this is a bad idea, explain why!! I appreciate your examples, but showing typical uses doesn't explain what's wrong with what I'm trying to do :/
Apr
20
comment make an object behave like an Array for parallel assignment in ruby
Subtle indeed; this is similar distinction between == and eql? which I really don't like. Why is a good idea to have to_a AND to_ary ???
Apr
20
comment make an object behave like an Array for parallel assignment in ruby
I think you meant to put brackets around "a", "b", "c" in your first example. When I tried it, I got a syntax error.
Apr
20
comment Converting an array of keys and an array of values into a hash in Ruby
This is great. Shame that you have to * and flatten the zip in older versions of Ruby though :(