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15h
revised Regex search and replace match only
added 15 characters in body
17h
revised Comparing two text files and printing out matching ids, sub_ids and timestamp related to the id
deleted 2 characters in body
18h
revised wxPerl: add component which resizes automatically when parent frame gets resized
added 715 characters in body
18h
comment Regex search and replace match only
Now you've broken it! You want \s+, not \W+ or \w+
19h
revised wxPerl: add component which resizes automatically when parent frame gets resized
added 1 character in body
19h
revised wxPerl: add component which resizes automatically when parent frame gets resized
added 96 characters in body
19h
answered wxPerl: add component which resizes automatically when parent frame gets resized
21h
comment Regex search and replace match only
It is a little strange to use \W+ to match whitespace
1d
comment perl print OUT and print not showing the same data
@user3360439: That doesn't explain why the behaviour is different when you specify a file handle. Please write the answer up properly as a solution and accept it, so that others can see that the problem has been resolved and that it coiuld be useful if they have a similar problem
1d
comment Perl sort with time stamp using hash
A hash won't help you to sort data. Please show the code that you tried
1d
comment perl print OUT and print not showing the same data
That is a wild stab in the dark. There's no reason a space after the function name should cause this behaviour as both statements are the same after the file handle. In any case whitespace at that point is ignored in Perl, and it would be bizarre if it caused the parentheses to be ignored
1d
comment perl print OUT and print not showing the same data
Are those two lines really adjacent like that? Can you fill @col with something simpler like 'A' .. 'F' and get the same result? What do you mean exactly by "the rest of the output is all in the last cell"? Can you show some sample output?
1d
comment How to sort current date to past date in Perl Time::Piece
@PatrickJ.S.: It's up to you what you do, but optimising your code before profiling it at the expense of legibility is bad practice. You could move the map function into a subroutine if you preferred, or make use of nsort_by from List::UtilsBy. But using a Transform every time you do a sort is unnecessary and obfuscatory
1d
comment How to sort current date to past date in Perl Time::Piece
@PatrickJ.S.: I generally use map in that situation. The OP's code is a broken perversion of an earlier solution that I wrote for him. Imagine that the sort block reads { my ($aa, $bb) = map { Time::Piece->strptime($_->[2], '%m/%d/%Y% H:%M')->epoch } ($a, $b); $aa <=> $bb; } and there you have a DRY solution
1d
comment Convert Binary File To String In Perl
Where did you get that display from? It is much more useful to display binary content in hex
1d
comment How to sort current date to past date in Perl Time::Piece
“This is very inefficient, since it calls Time::Piece->strptime and the epoch method for every comparison” This is true, but it is wrong to sacrifice legibility and introduce a triple-transform when it is more that likely already fast enough. Premature optimization is the root of all evilDonald Knuth
1d
comment How to sort current date to past date in Perl Time::Piece
I don't understand why you modified my previous answer so that it doesn't work. You have added a comma in the string "$date, $time" so that the result won't parse any more; you have changed my ($aa, $bb) to my ($date, $time) when that isn't the values they hold; you have removed the comparison $aa <=> $bb from the sort block, which is the entire purpose of the block; and you have added a third parameter to Time::Piece::strptime when it only accepts two. You have broken perfectly good code, and I don't see any purpose to your tinkering
1d
comment Usage of -c in perl with code that modifies @INC
I don't really understand your question. What makes you think that perl -c is different from perl in this regard?
1d
answered Extract lines between A and (B or C), containing D
1d
comment Perl sort with time stamp using hash
Have you tried anything?