43,784 reputation
31342
bio website
location England, United Kingdom
age 56
visits member for 3 years, 2 months
seen 7 hours ago

I am passionate about mathematics, the applied sciences, linguistics and theoretical computer science. Perl has been by far the most useful vehicle to experiment and express myself, but my interest extends to all closed systems and I have a working knowledge of most common programming and data languages

If you like my work and would like to buy some please get in touch. I'm sure you will find a way :)


Mar
19
comment Perl: alter a string by regex match
I don't know what code you're running to get that result. What you have published hash three syntax errors and so won't compile. When they are fixed it does exactly what you say you want.
Mar
19
revised Perl: alter a string by regex match
added 87 characters in body
Mar
19
comment Perl: alter a string by regex match
@hobbs: It substitutes a null string just like the original. It also raises a warning because it has uninitialized warnings enabled, which I think is desirable.
Mar
19
revised Perl: alter a string by regex match
added 87 characters in body
Mar
19
answered Perl: alter a string by regex match
Mar
19
revised Does sorting help efficiency of grep in Perl
added 4 characters in body
Mar
19
comment What is the difference between “my” and “our” in terms of symbolic references?
@JoelBerger: That makes little sense. Should this question be open or closed?
Mar
19
comment What is the difference between “my” and “our” in terms of symbolic references?
@JoelBerger: That a construct is bad practice is a dreadful reason to close a question in the first place, and hence a dreadful reason not to reopen it. The correct answer should be given with a proviso, and that cannot be done for a closed question.
Mar
19
answered Does sorting help efficiency of grep in Perl
Mar
19
comment Does sorting help efficiency of grep in Perl
grep checks all of the list elements regardless of context. It simply returns a list in list context and a count in scalar context. first and similar are a bad choice here as the entire list is copied to the parameters of the function, which is a big deal for hundreds of thousands of scalars. The best solution is a simple for loop with a last once the condition has been satisfied. A loop like that will terminate sooner if the match is near the beginning of the list, and if it can be detected that the loop has gone beyond any potential match.
Mar
19
comment Pausing a perl script while SFTP transfers files
It is not a core module, so needs installing. You may be lucky with cpanm Net::SFTP. Otherwise (or anyway) read How to install CPAN modules
Mar
19
comment What is the difference between “my” and “our” in terms of symbolic references?
The referenced question is different in that it is a general question about lexical and package variables. This question asks specifically about soft references.
Mar
19
revised What is the difference between “my” and “our” in terms of symbolic references?
added 7 characters in body
Mar
19
comment Pausing a perl script while SFTP transfers files
You should use a module, like Net::SFTP, rather than shelling out to the command-line utility.
Mar
19
comment Perl looping through the Oracle query doesn't produce any data after the first one
You're welcome. But the code you show doesn't do that?
Mar
19
comment Perl looping through the Oracle query doesn't produce any data after the first one
Well your code doesn't show anything that displays $pointer, and for some reason you are calling execute twice. Is $sql displaying correctly?
Mar
19
revised Perl looping through the Oracle query doesn't produce any data after the first one
added 151 characters in body
Mar
19
answered Perl looping through the Oracle query doesn't produce any data after the first one
Mar
19
revised Perl looping through the Oracle query doesn't produce any data after the first one
Added Oracle to tags. Improved English. Added whitespace to Perl code
Mar
19
comment Partial file memory mapping using File::Map
@ikegami: Interestingly, just replacing CORE::readline with sub myreadline { return readline $_[0] } more than halves the performance. It would take a Tie::File_XS to do significantly better.