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comment Split a string into a hash of arrays in perl
@Joshua: I guess that makes sense. But that means I'm getting points for posting first, and I don't like that
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comment Alternative to many substitutions in a row?
I don't think that helps a lot without an example. I realise that the OP has offered no sample data, but it would have been best to ask for something before writing a very generic solution
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comment Read text file and change it
@Biffen: Do you know of a module for tab-separated data? I can't find one, and it would be so simple as to be redundant
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comment Read text file and change it
@Biffen: I disagree. A tab-separated data file should never use quoted fields or escaped quotes within fields, and it is really awkward to get the module to process a simple character-separated file format. Always use chomp and split /\t/ if you have a proper tab-separated file. If you don't then Text::CSV will fix nothing
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comment Read text file and change it
@stevieb: Yes I got that. Thank you. But I'm talking specifically about solutions that look like a = b and the whole world goes +1 wow yeah! a = b and then the author updates his solution saying, actually I meant that you should open the file in binary mode. Sadly, the world then goes +6 a = b and binary mode! hero!
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comment Read text file and change it
@Sobrique: I wonder what you think about solutions like this, where you can post pretty much anything that will probably not be tested, followed by one or more intermediate updates, and then a final update that answers the question. It's certainly a way to get points
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comment Read text file and change it
@stevieb: The primary reason for avoiding two-argument open calls is that it's tough to open a file called > or similar. That's not a problem on Windows, but is one of Unix's failings
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comment Read text file and change it
@123: “Why use lexical file handles?” should be a whole new separate question that I would be delighted to see! Please ask it
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comment Regex to obtain everything till the second to last occurrence
I think you need to show more code. "I have rrr.abc.tsy.html" tells us very little, Are those fields in a Perl array or in a single Perl string? If you can publish the code that created those values then we would be able to help much better
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comment Split a string into a hash of arrays in perl
Please could someone explain the upvotes? I don't think I should expect an upvote for writing working code. This is just common-sense programming. This would be very similar in any language except for the horrible C, which has no inherent useful data structures at at all, C++, which focuses on making C objects instead of providing a proper library, and Java, which is pretty much portable C++ that needs a virtual machine to run.
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comment Perl - Count occurances of array elements in text file?
@user145265: The "best" way is the one that you can read in a week's time and understand best what it's doing. It's the solution that best implies to you what it's doing. That's the reason for language words if, while, for` etc. not being op1, op2, op3; the language provides a framework that allows you write self-representative code. You can easily misuse it, but I suggest that you should use identifiers and language constructs that allow your code to be read as something approaching a natural language. Even assembler has stuff like MVB for move byte
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comment Perl - Count occurances of array elements in text file?
@123: "provided you don't want to create a hash of keys that never appear in array1" And why wouldn't you do that?
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comment not able fetch value from an hash in perl
The reason your program "isn't fetching you anything" is simply because the expression $send.$bill.$serv_cat doesn't match any of the keys of the hash that you have built. Add use Data::Dumper; $Data::Dumper::Useqq = 1; print Dumper $send.$bill.$serv_cat; to see what you really have. My bet is that those values are from terminal input and you haven't removed the trailing newline from them
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comment Perl - Count occurances of array elements in text file?
That involves unnecessarily looping over all the elements of @array2 multiple times (within grep). Also $i is a poor choice of identifier as it is generally used for an array index. It contains "words" from @array1 so how about $word?
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comment Read text file and change it
Wherever you are learning Perl, you should consider finding something more up to date. Global file handles like IN and OUT haven't been considered good practice for a long time now. And you should always use the three-argument form of open, like open my $in_fh, '<', 'Resources\shop.txt' or die $!
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comment html form post a value string with underscore to perl cgi
What is the content of $buffer?
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comment Keeping a hash sorted after converting to two arrays
Yes, you are sorting the elements alphabetically by value. That is what I wrote. If your example had ten => 10 then it would be sorted before two => 2. And you really have no idea what the OP wants, as all they have said is that they have a sorted hash, which they clearly do not
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comment Keeping a hash sorted after converting to two arrays
This assumes that the OP wants the hash elements sorted in alphabetical order of their value, even though you have supposed them to be numeric. That is a very long shot indeed
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comment Keeping a hash sorted after converting to two arrays
I don't see how you can possibly sort anything with a for loop. As I have said, if you show the code that you think "sorts" the hash then we will have a better idea of what you are doing
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comment Keeping a hash sorted after converting to two arrays
“I have a sorted hash”. No, you don't. Perl hashes are inherently unsorted, and deliberately so.