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Sep
8
accepted Haskell Haddock latex equation in comments
Jul
22
accepted C++ functor (mapping)
Jul
21
comment C++ functor (mapping)
A functor has to obey two laws map id = id and map (p . q) = (map p) . (map q). Of course it is not realistic to verify whether these laws hold for a derived class in a programming language like C++ so lets ignore that for now. It is possible due to programmer error that a non-functor (which just happens to have a function "map") gets passed to a function that relies on the functor laws. A strongly typed system would warn during compile time that the object passed is not derived from functor. Duck typing would not catch this kind of programming error.
Jul
21
comment C++ functor (mapping)
I would like a stronger guarantee than that the DS class just happens to have a function called map with a compatible type signature. Please do note I am asking the question out of genuine interest for the C++ programming language, not because I am on some software development project deadline.
Jul
21
awarded  Commentator
Jul
21
comment C++ functor (mapping)
DS is any derived datastructure from functor (it implements map)
Jul
21
comment C++ functor (mapping)
That is alright! What if I have a function template<typename <float> DS> DS<int> discretizeAny(DS<float> &ds) { return ds.map(discretize); } that discretizes any datastructure that is a functor, whether it's a D, a list, a tree and so on? I am not asking why I would need a functor, I am asking if it is possible to define a class in C++ that guarantees all non-abstract derived classes can be mapped over.
Jul
21
comment C++ functor (mapping)
@Igor imagine some generic datastructure D that contains floats (D<float> instance) and derives from functor<float, D<float>>. Now take a function std::function<int (float)> discretize. I want my datastructure to be able to turn from a D<float> to a D<int> by writing instance.map(discretize);. Here, it should be infered by the compiler that b in the declaration of map is an int and it should look for definitions of a function D<float>.map<int>(const std::function<int (float)> &) in the derived class.
Jul
21
asked C++ functor (mapping)
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Jun
15
asked Haskell Haddock latex equation in comments
Apr
30
awarded  Critic
Apr
3
awarded  Yearling
Mar
12
accepted yesod persistent postgresql complex record
Dec
17
awarded  Nice Question
Oct
7
awarded  Promoter
Oct
6
revised yesod persistent postgresql complex record
edited title
Oct
5
asked yesod persistent postgresql complex record
Aug
6
awarded  Popular Question
Feb
24
revised shakespeare-js fails to compile on Heroku
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