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  • 26 votes cast
May
9
comment removing double backslash from string containing some of them
Note that when you print a string that contains a single backslash, Haskell will quote that backslash. Are you sure that the string actually contains a double backslash, or might it just have a \n in it? The confusing thing about your question is that in Haskell syntax, the first string contains a \n, whereas the second contains a literal ascii newline character.
May
8
revised Why is this Haskell program allocating so much memory?
added 10 characters in body
May
8
answered Why is this Haskell program allocating so much memory?
Apr
15
awarded  Caucus
Mar
9
comment Situations to (not) use lazy pattern matching on tuples
Well, in the case of the state monad, I would say as fairly firm rule of thumb, yes. I would be interested in any exceptions that you might discover. In the context of your original question, however, the performance difference is often not nearly so dramatic. For whatever reasons, the lazy state monad is a particularly pathological case, at least when used from a typical imperative mindset.
Mar
8
comment Situations to (not) use lazy pattern matching on tuples
The performance of the lazy bind given above is truly terrible for typical (i.e. non-exotic) use cases. In my past experience, using the strict bind instead often speeds up programs by a factor of anywhere from 10x to 50x.
Jul
28
awarded  Critic
Jul
28
awarded  Commentator
Jul
28
comment IO/Monadic assign operator causing ghci to explode for infinite list
Certainly seems like a bug in GHCi to me. Interestingly, this manifests in GHCi even if you compile the module with optimizations and then load the compiled code into GHCi. It works fine if you just compile it and run it without GHCi, even without optimizations. So it would seem that something in GHCi is maintaining a reference to the head of the list, which isn't even visible outside the module.
Jul
18
comment Do cryptographic hash functions reach each possible value, e.g. are they surjective?
Your proposition may or may not be true, but your argument is, at best, grossly oversimplified to the point of being incorrect, and at worst completely bogus. You are misapplying the random oracle model, and since we can work with the internal structure of SHA-1, there is the possibility of definitively proving surjectivity without attacking SHA-1 itself. For example, you can easily prove surjectivity of a modified SHA-1 with a parameterized IV.
May
31
awarded  Yearling
May
31
answered How to trim whitespaces in JSON datatype of Postgres?
Apr
25
revised Group with levenshtein distance
added 3 characters in body
Apr
25
answered Group with levenshtein distance
Apr
23
comment PostgreSQL Trigger and Function populating too many columns
You really should rethink your schema here, you really shouldn't be repeating columns like that. That will greatly simplify your trigger as well.
Apr
23
comment Why is this tail-recursive Haskell function slower ?
Speaking a bit more precisely, the recursion in the second example is through a thunk; the second function doesn't actually call itself directly. Instead it returns a list consisting of the first element consed onto a thunk to compute the rest of the list. So no, the second example won't run out of stack space any more quickly. You do need some strictness annotations on the first element of the result to guarantee the best stack usage though, as written stack consumption depends on how the result is consumed.
Apr
21
answered Understanding different foldr statments
Apr
21
awarded  Yearling
Apr
21
revised Why is this tail-recursive Haskell function slower ?
edited body
Apr
21
answered Why is this tail-recursive Haskell function slower ?